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Psychosocial and Environmental Factors Associated with Dog

By Anne-Elizabeth Straub, Megan H. McDonough, Nancy E. Edwards, RM Lyle, Philip J. Troped

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Abstract

Dog walking is associated with higher levels of physical activity (PA). However, not all dog owners walk their dog(s) at a level sufficient for health benefits. Therefore, identifying correlates of dog walking may help to inform the design of more effective interventions to promote this specific form of PA. The purpose of this study was to examine psychosocial and environmental correlates of dog walking and relationships of dog walking with overall PA. In 2010, 391 dog owners (Mage= 43.6±12.3 years) completed a survey. Multiple logistic regression and structural equation modeling were used to examine psychosocial and environmental correlates of dog walking status, weekly minutes of dog walking and relationships of dog walking with overall PA. Self-efficacy for dog walking, dog-related outcome expectancies, family social support, dog social support, and neighborhood walking environment were associated with a 1.3 to 5.6 greater odds of being a dog walker. Self-efficacy mediated relationships between family support, dog support, and presence of a yard and dog walking. Neighborhood environment, including the presence of greenery and trails, was also positively associated with duration of dog walking (β=0.17; p 

Submitter

Katie Carroll

Date 2013
Publication Title School of Nursing Faculty Publications
Pages 25
Publisher Purdue University
URL http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/nursingpubs/12/
Language English
Additional Language English
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Tags
  1. Animal roles
  2. Dogs
  3. environmental interactions
  4. Exercise
  5. Health
  6. Mammals
  7. Pet ownership
  8. Pets and companion animals
  9. physical activity
  10. Physical environment
  11. psychosocial issues
  12. Walking