The HABRI Foundation is calling for research proposals to investigate the health outcomes of pet ownership and/or animal-assisted activity or therapy, both for the people and the animals involved. To learn more, visit https://habri.org/grants/funding-opportunities/ close

 
You are here: Home / Journal Articles / Inroads into equestrian safety: rider-reported factors contributing to horse-related accidents and near misses on Australian roads / About

Inroads into equestrian safety: rider-reported factors contributing to horse-related accidents and near misses on Australian roads

By K. Thompson, C. Matthews

View Resource (HTM)

Licensed under

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

Horse riding and horse-related interactions are inherently dangerous. When they occur on public roads, the risk profile of equestrian activities is complicated by interactions with other road users. Research has identified speed, proximity, visibility, conspicuity and mutual misunderstanding as factors contributing to accidents and near misses. However, little is known about their significance or incidence in Australia. To explore road safety issues amongst Australian equestrians, we conducted an online survey. More than half of all riders (52%) reported having experienced at least one accident or near miss in the 12 months prior to the survey. Whilst our findings confirm the factors identified overseas, we also identified issues around rider misunderstanding of road rules and driver misunderstanding of rider hand signals. Of particular concern, we also found reports of potentially dangerous rider-directed road rage. We identify several areas for potential safety intervention including (1) identifying equestrians as vulnerable road users and horses as sentient decision-making vehicles; (2) harmonising laws regarding passing horses; (3) mandating personal protective equipment; (4) improving road signage; (5) comprehensive data collection; (6) developing mutual understanding amongst road-users; (7) safer road design and alternative riding spaces; and (8) increasing investment in horse-related safety initiatives.

Publication Title Animals
Volume 5
Issue 3
Pages 592-609
ISBN/ISSN 2076-2615
DOI 10.3390/ani5030374
Language English
Author Address The Appleton Institute, CQUniversity, 44 Greenhill Road, Wayville, SA 5034, Australia.kirrilly.thompson@cqu.edu.au
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tags
  1. Animals
  2. APEC countries
  3. Australasia
  4. Australia
  5. Commonwealth of Nations
  6. Countries
  7. Decision making
  8. Developed countries
  9. Horses
  10. Humans
  11. Mammals
  12. Men
  13. Oceania
  14. OECD countries
  15. peer-reviewed
  16. Primates
  17. risk factors
  18. safety
  19. surveys
  20. trauma
  21. ungulates
  22. vertebrates
Badges
  1. peer-reviewed