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An exploratory analysis of the emergence and implications of breed specific legislation: Knee-jerk reaction or warranted response?

By Niki Rae Huitson

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Category Theses
Abstract

The main objective of this thesis was to survey and critically analyze the increased attention and call for legislation addressing "dangerous dogs" and, more generally, animal control in urban landscapes. Breed Specific Legislation (BSL), the banning or restricting of the ownership of a dog solely based on the dog's breed regardless of the dog's aggressiveness, was one suggestion put forward in response to the perceived "dog bite" problem. By examining the history and origin of BSL, an understanding of the legislation and its intended function emerged. In particular, the perception that Breed Specific Legislation is a knee jerk response or a quick regulatory reaction to media amplification, claimsmakers' protest and public outcry over the "dog bite" problem was explored. Research benefits include an analysis of the BSL debate, an exploration of the opinions of major stakeholders, an examination of alternative methods of animal control and a call for evidence-based policy.

Submitter

Marcy Wilhelm-South

Purdue University

Date 2005
Pages 112
Department School of Criminology
Degree Master of Arts
URL http://summit.sfu.ca/item/10235
Language English
University Simon Fraser University
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Tags
  1. Animal roles
  2. Criminology
  3. Dog Breeds
  4. Legislation
  5. Pets and companion animals