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Investigating the welfare, management and human-animal interactions of cattle in four Indonesian abattoirs

By R. E. Doyle, G. J. Coleman, D. M. McGill, M. Reed, W. Ramdani, P. H. Hemsworth

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Abstract

This study reports novel information on the animal handling, management and human-animal interactions in Indonesian cattle abattoirs. The slaughter of 304 cattle was observed and there was a high percentage of re-stuns in all abattoirs (range: 8-18.9%) when compared to a variety of international auditing guidelines. The average stun-to-neck cut time was within international recommendations (average: 9 s; range: 4-15 s). Time spent in lairage varied between animals and facilities and was compliant with international guidelines. Handling times were extremely variable (2 s-23 min 40 s), but were only weakly correlated with a variety of handler techniques including the total number of handler interactions (sum of visual, auditory and tactile interactions), suggesting that long handling time does not increase handler interactions. There was a moderate correlation between the subjective handling scale and most of the objective behaviours, indicating that this may be a useful way to summarise handler behaviour in future assessments. The current study provides novel information about animal welfare in Indonesian abattoirs and highlights that management practices at the four abattoirs generally comply with international standards. The results also suggest that the subjective handling scale was moderately associated with the frequency of handler interactions, and so may be a useful measure of handler behaviour.

Publication Title Animal Welfare
Volume 25
Issue 2
Pages 191-197
ISBN/ISSN 0962-7286
DOI 10.7120/09627286.25.2.191
Language English
Author Address Animal Welfare Science Centre, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia.rebecca.doyle@unimelb.edu.au
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Tags
  1. Agriculture
  2. Animals
  3. Animal slaughter
  4. Animal welfare
  5. APEC countries
  6. ASEAN Countries
  7. Asia
  8. Bovidae
  9. Cattle
  10. Cleaning
  11. Developing countries
  12. Guidelines
  13. Handling
  14. Indonesia
  15. Instruments
  16. Interactions
  17. Mammals
  18. Methodologies
  19. ratings
  20. Ruminants
  21. Science
  22. slaughter
  23. slaughterhouses
  24. standards
  25. Storage and Transport Equipment
  26. Techniques
  27. technology
  28. ungulates
  29. vertebrates
  30. Veterinary sciences