You are here: Home / Theses / Using a dog demography field study to inform the development of an agent-based computer simulation. Evaluating owned dog population control interventions in a small, semi-urban community in Mexico / About

Using a dog demography field study to inform the development of an agent-based computer simulation. Evaluating owned dog population control interventions in a small, semi-urban community in Mexico

By Luz Maria Kisiel

View Link (HTM)

Licensed according to this deed.

Category Theses
Abstract

This thesis evaluates the potential effects of different dog population control interventions in a small, semi-urban community in Mexico. First, a cross-sectional study was conducted to characterize dog ecology and demography in Villa de Tezontepec, Hidalgo. Approximately 65% of the households owned one or more dogs. The majority of owned dogs (76%) were not sterilized, and less than half (45%) were kept confined. Second, a stochastic, agent-based simulation model was constructed to determine the projected impact of surgical sterilization interventions and increased dog confinement on the owned dog population size for this community. The model outputs suggested that surgical sterilization interventions focused only on young dogs (prior to sexual maturity) could yield greater reductions in population size than surgical interventions focused on dogs of mixed age. The information generated in this thesis can help to identify considerations for the design and implementation of dog population control programs in developing countries.

Submitter

Mason N McLary

HABRI Central

Date 2017
Pages 187
Publisher The University of Guelph
Location of Publication Guelph, Ontario
Department Population Medicine
Degree Population Medicine
URL http://hdl.handle.net/10214/10235
Language English
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tags
  1. Animal roles
  2. Animals in culture
  3. Animal welfare
  4. Confinement
  5. Demography
  6. dog population
  7. Dogs
  8. Ecology
  9. Health
  10. Mammals
  11. Mexico
  12. Physical environment
  13. population control
  14. Social Environments
  15. sterilization
  16. young animals