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Attachment Style Is Related to Quality of Life for Assistance Dog Owners

By N. White, D. Mills, S. Hall

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

Attachment styles have been shown to affect quality of life. Growing interest in the value of companion animals highlights that owning a dog can also affect quality of life, yet little research has explored the role of the attachment bond in affecting the relationship between dog ownership and quality of life. Given that the impact of dog ownership on quality of life may be greater for assistance dog owners than pet dog owners, we explored how anxious attachment and avoidance attachment styles to an assistance dog affected owner quality of life (n = 73). Regression analysis revealed that higher anxious attachment to the dog predicted enhanced quality of life. It is suggested that the unique, interdependent relationship between an individual and their assistance dog may mean that an anxious attachment style is not necessarily detrimental. Feelings that indicate attachment insecurity in other relationships may reflect more positive aspects of the assistance dog owner relationship, such as the level of support that the dog provides its owner.

Date 2017
Publication Title International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume 14
Issue 6
Pages 8
ISBN/ISSN 1660-4601
Publisher MDPI
DOI 10.3390/ijerph14060658
URL https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/14/6/658
Language English
Author Address School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, Lincoln LN6 7DL, UK. naomiwhite16@hotmail.com.School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, Lincoln LN6 7DL, UK. dmills@lincoln.ac.uk.School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, Lincoln LN6 7DL, UK. shall@lincoln.ac.uk.
Additional Language English
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Tags
  1. Adults
  2. Age
  3. Animal roles
  4. Animals
  5. Anxiety
  6. Assistance animals
  7. Attachment
  8. Bonds
  9. Dogs
  10. Emotions
  11. Females
  12. Humans
  13. Males
  14. Middle Aged Adults
  15. Older adults
  16. open access
  17. Ownership
  18. Pets and companion animals
  19. Quality of life
  20. United Kingdom
  21. Young Adult
Badges
  1. open access