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Disability assistance animals or not? Problems in policy and practice workshop: summary and scoping discussion paper

By Paul Harpur, Martie-Louise Verreynne, Nancy Pachana, Peter Billings, Brent Ritchie

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Abstract

The Federal Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cth) (DDA) defines assistance animals to include dogs or other animals that are trained to assist a person with a disability to alleviate the effect of the disability and to meet standards of hygiene and behaviour that are appropriate for an animal in a public place. The Federal Court of Australia Full Court has read this definition widely to include a selftrained dog that has not been accredited or trained by a recognised specialist disability animal training association. Considering an estimated four million Australians could claim to have a disability under the wide definition of disability in the DDA, and the extremely low bar to establish that an animal provides assistance to a person with a disability, the impact of these laws are significant and are generating substantial concerns to government, industry and the disability community.

Submitter

Marcy Wilhelm-South

Purdue University

Date October 2016
Pages 30
Publisher The University of Queensland
URL https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:409735
Language English
Institution The University of Queensland
citation Harpur, Paul, Verreynne, Martie-Louise, Pachana, Nancy, Billings, Peter and Brent Ritchie (2016). Disability assistance animals or not? Problems in policy and practice workshop: summary and scoping discussion paper. T.C. Beirne School of Law, The University of Queensland.
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Tags
  1. Animal roles
  2. Animal training
  3. Disabilities
  4. open access
  5. Pets and companion animals
  6. Service animals
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  1. open access