The HABRI Foundation is calling for research proposals to investigate the health outcomes of pet ownership and/or animal-assisted activity or therapy, both for the people and the animals involved. To learn more, visit https://habri.org/grants/funding-opportunities/ close

 
You are here: Home / Journal Articles / Patient Opinion of Visiting Therapy Dogs in a Hospital Emergency Department / About

Patient Opinion of Visiting Therapy Dogs in a Hospital Emergency Department

By J. Reddekopp, C. A. Dell, B. Rohr, B. Fornssler, M. Gibson, B. Carey, J. Stempien

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

To date there have been no studies examining whether patients want emergency department (ED) therapy dog programs. This patient-oriented study examined the opinions of patients about whether they would want to be visited by a therapy dog in the Royal University Hospital ED. Cross-sectional survey data were collected over a six week period from a convenience sample of 100 adult patients who had not been visited by a therapy dog in the ED. Most (80%) indicated they would want a visit by a therapy dog as an ED patient. A higher proportion of individuals who currently have a pet dog (95%) or identify as having lots of experience with dogs (71%) were more likely to indicate this want compared to those without a dog (90%) or little to no experience with dogs (62%). The majority were also of the opinion that patients may want to visit a therapy dog in the ED to reduce anxiety (92%) and frustration (87%) as well as to increase comfort (90%) and satisfaction (90%) and to a lesser extent to reduce pain (59%). There was no significant difference in findings by gender or age, other than a higher proportion of older adults and females identifying cultural background and tradition as a possible reason that patients may not want to be visited by a therapy dog. The findings of this study can help guide considerations for future ED therapy dog programs.

Date 2020
Publication Title International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume 17
Issue 8
Pages 10
ISBN/ISSN 1661-7827 (Print)1660-4601
Publisher MDPI
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17082968
URL https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/17/8/2968
Language English
Author Address Faculty of Education, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2, Canada.Department of Sociology & School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A5, Canada.College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A5, Canada.School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A5, Canada.Department of Sociology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A5, Canada.Emergency Department, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A5, Canada.
Additional Language English
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tags
  1. Age
  2. Animal-assisted therapies
  3. Animals
  4. Anxiety
  5. Companion
  6. Cross-Sectional Studies
  7. Dogs
  8. Emergency
  9. emergency care
  10. Females
  11. Hospitals
  12. Humans
  13. open access
  14. Pain
  15. patients
  16. Public health
  17. therapy animals
Badges
  1. open access