The HABRI Foundation is calling for research proposals to investigate the health outcomes of pet ownership and/or animal-assisted activity or therapy, both for the people and the animals involved. To learn more, visit https://habri.org/grants/funding-opportunities/ close

 
You are here: Home / Journal Articles / Associations between lesion-specific lameness and the milk yield of 1,635 dairy cows from seven herds in the Xth region of Chile and implications for management of lame dairy cows worldwide / About

Associations between lesion-specific lameness and the milk yield of 1,635 dairy cows from seven herds in the Xth region of Chile and implications for management of lame dairy cows worldwide

By L. E. Green, J. Borkert, G. Monti, N. Tadich

View Resource (HTM)

Licensed under

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

Lameness is one of the greatest infringements of welfare in dairy cows. The objective of this study was to investigate associations between milk yield and foot lesions causing lameness in Chilean dairy cattle with the hypothesis that if we can demonstrate that lameness reduces yield, and so income, from lame dairy cows then we have both economic and welfare arguments for reducing lameness in dairy cattle. For one year, all lame cows from seven farms with Holstein Friesian cattle were treated by their herdsmen. Herdsmen were trained by the researcher and a colour atlas was utilised to assist in diagnosis of lesions. All abnormalities on the foot and the suspected cause of lameness were recorded, and cattle were treated. A two-level hierarchical model with repeated monthly test-day yields within cows was used to investigate the impact of double sole (DS), sole ulcer (SU), white line disease (WLD), digital dermatitis (DD) and all 'other' causes of lameness on milk yield before and after treatment. There were 1,635 cows with complete data. Cattle with a DS were higher yielding than cattle that were never lame with a reduction in yield from four months before treatment. Cattle lame with DD were higher yielding than non-lame cattle before and after treatment. For all causes of lameness, yield increased the month after treatment. We conclude that lesions causing lameness reduced the milk yield of dairy cows in these seven herds in Chile. We discuss the current evidence base for prevention of lameness in dairy cows and hypothesise that rapid treatment is a feasible current approach to improve cow welfare immediately and probably reduce milk lost; more evidence for effective prevention is required.

Date 2010
Publication Title Animal Welfare
Volume 19
Issue 4
Pages 419-427
ISBN/ISSN 0962-7286
Language English
Author Address Department of Biological Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK.laura.green@warwick.ac.uk
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tags
  1. Abnormal development
  2. animal breed
  3. Animal diseases
  4. Animal genetics
  5. Animal rights
  6. Animal roles
  7. Animal welfare
  8. Cattle
  9. Chile
  10. Claw
  11. Dairy animals
  12. Dermatitis
  13. Developed countries
  14. Diagnosis
  15. Dog Breeds
  16. Farm animals
  17. Feet
  18. Food animals
  19. Horses
  20. Income
  21. Lameness
  22. Latin America
  23. Lesions
  24. Mammals
  25. Milk and dairy products
  26. Parasites
  27. performance traits
  28. pest control
  29. prevention
  30. skin diseases
  31. South America
  32. therapeutics
  33. therapy
  34. Threshold Countries
  35. Ulcers
  36. United States of America
  37. World
  38. yields