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Pets Are Associated with Fewer Peer Problems and Emotional Symptoms, and Better Prosocial Behavior: Findings from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children

By H. Christian, F. Mitrou, R. Cunneen, S. R. Zubrick

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Category Journal Articles
Publication Title J Pediatr
Volume 220
Pages 200-206.e2
ISBN/ISSN 0022-3476
DOI 10.1016/j.jpeds.2020.01.012
Language eng
Author Address School of Population and Global Health, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia; Telethon Kids Institute, Perth Children's Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia; Centre for Child Health Research, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia. Electronic address: hayley.christian@telethonkids.org.au.Telethon Kids Institute, Perth Children's Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia; Centre for Child Health Research, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia.School of Population and Global Health, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia.
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Tags
  1. Australia
  2. Bonds
  3. Cats
  4. Children
  5. Development
  6. Dogs
  7. Emotions
  8. Females
  9. Humans
  10. Infants
  11. Longitudinal studies
  12. Males
  13. peers
  14. Pets and companion animals
  15. preschools
  16. Social behavior