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Human-Animal Interaction Bulletin Volume 8 Issue 1

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Marcy Wilhelm-South

Purdue University

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In This Series

  1. The Relationship Between Humane Interactions with Animals, Empathy, and Prosocial Behavior among Children

    Full-text: Available

    Journal Articles | Contributor(s): Matthew Wice, Namrata Goyal, Nicole Forsyth, Karly Noel, Emanuele Castano

    We investigated the relationship between empathy, prosocial behavior, and frequency of humane interactions with animals among 3rd grade children (n = 158).  We measured the frequency of humane interactions with animals via the Children's Treatment of Animals Questionnaire (Thompson &...

  2. Book Review: "Clinician's Guide to Treating Companion Animal Issues"

    Full-text: Available

    Journal Articles | Contributor(s): A. Matamonasa-Bennett

    The Clinicianís Guide is a watershed work in the field of HAI. It is an edited collection of academic scholarship which fills an important void for mental health clinicians. As stated in the introduction to the volume, companion animals play ever increasing roles as friends and family...

  3. Human Helping of Animals: What Motivates It?

    Full-text: Available

    Journal Articles | Contributor(s): Lauren E. Highfill, Mark H. Davis

    While considerable research has been carried out to understand helping offered to other humans, relatively little research has focused specifically on the motivations underlying helping for animals. It is possible that the social psychological helping literature may help shed light on the...

  4. Practitioners Corner

    Full-text: Available

    Journal Articles | Contributor(s): Phyllis Erdman, Amy Johnson, Lynette Arnason Hart

    As science begins to support what we have long intuitively known, that human-animal interactions offer numerous benefits, animal-assisted interventions (AAIs) are becoming increasingly popular. Unfortunately, with the rapid growth of AAIs, many clinicians who include animals lack sufficient...

  5. Animal-Assisted Activities for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Full-text: Available

    Journal Articles | Contributor(s): Page Walker Buck, Angela Lavery

    This exploratory study was designed to investigate parental perceptions of animal- assisted activities for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In-depth interviews with 10 families provided insight into the possible mechanisms by which human-animal interactions impact...

  6. The Effects of Kinship, Reciprocity, and Conscious Deliberation on the Level of Concern for Non-Humans: How Our Psychology Affects Levels of Concern for Non-Humans

    Full-text: Available

    Journal Articles | Contributor(s): Barton Thompson, Cindy Quinter

    As hunter-gatherers, it is unlikely that humans evolved psychological tendencies to extend high levels of concern for predator or prey species. Our coalitional psychology, which evolved to regulate human interactions with other humans, might be the basis for the extension of ethical concerns to...

  7. Examining the Effect of an Animal-Assisted Intervention on Patient Distress in Outpatient Cystoscopy

    Full-text: Available

    Journal Articles | Contributor(s): Sandra Barker, Sarah Krzastek, Rebecca Vokes, Christine Schubert, Lauren Folgosa Cooley, Lance J. Hampton

    Animal assisted interventions (AAI) have ben shown to improve patient outcomes in some healthcare settings. Flexible cystoscopy, while minimally invasive, is associated with patient-reported pain, fear, and anxiety. Few techniques have been found to improve these adverse effects associated with...

  8. Rationalizing the Many Uses of Animals: Application of the 4N Justifications Beyond Meat

    Full-text: Available

    Journal Articles | Contributor(s): Jared Piazza, Lucy Cooper, Shannon Slater-Johnson

    Past research has uncovered four common justifications for using animals as food -- the 4Ns -- that eating meat is Natural, Normal, Necessary, and Nice. The current research investigated the extent to which the 4Ns might apply more generally to other animal uses. Two studies examined the moral...