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At Both Ends of the Leash: Preventing Service-Dog Oppression Through the Practice of Dyadic-Belonging

By Devon MacPherson-Mayor, Cheryl van Daalen-Smith

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Category Journal Articles
Abstract

There is a growing interest in the “use” of service-dogs to enable people with disabilities to navigate the world more independently in North American culture. On the surface, while this may appear to be progress, the question remains, for whom? While there is evidence that the presence of a service-dog is beneficial for those living with a variety of disabilities, this trend is not devoid of embedded assumptions and a related need for caution. How disabled people are viewed and treated, matters. How nonhuman animals, in this case dogs, are viewed and treated equally matters. One set of needs stemming from structural oppression must not eclipse another's set of needs. The use of one party in order to emancipate another, is therefore fraught with necessary cautions. There are shared oppressions and rights at both ends of the service dog leash.

 

Date 2020
Publication Title At Both Ends of the Leash: Preventing Service-Dog Oppression Through the Practice of Dyadic-Belonging
Volume 9
Issue 2
Pages 73-102
ISBN/ISSN 1929-9192
Publisher Canadian Journal of Disability Studies
Location of Publication Waterloo, Ontario
DOI https://doi.org/10.15353/cjds.v9i2.626
URL https://cjds.uwaterloo.ca/index.php/cjds/article/view/626
Language English
Additional Language English
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Tags
  1. Animal-assisted activities
  2. Animal-assisted therapies
  3. Animal rights
  4. Animal roles
  5. Disabilities
  6. Dogs
  7. Mammals
  8. Service animals
  9. Working animals