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Reducing the number of animals used in behavioural genetic experiments using chromosome substitution strains

By M. C. Laarakker, F. Ohl, H. A. van Lith

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Category Journal Articles
Abstract

Chromosome substitution strains (also called consomic lines or strains) are strains in which a single, full-length chromosome from one inbred strain - the donor strain - has been transferred onto the genetic background of a second inbred strain - the host strain. Based on the results obtained from behavioural tests with the two parental strains, the minimum number of animals from each of the host and consomic strains that are required for a successful behavioural genetic analysis can be estimated. Correct application of statistical knowledge can lead to a further reduction in the number of animals used in behavioural genetic experiments using chromosome substitution strains.

Date 2006
Publication Title Animal Welfare
Volume 15
Issue 1
Pages 49-54
ISBN/ISSN 0962-7286
Language English
Author Address Department of Animals, Science & Society, Division of Laboratory Animal Science, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, PO Box 80.166, 3508 TD Utrecht, Netherlands. M.C.Laarakker@vet.uu.nl
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Tags
  1. Alternative methods
  2. Animal behavior
  3. Animal genetics
  4. Animal rights
  5. Animal roles
  6. Animal testing
  7. Animal welfare
  8. Chromosomes
  9. Genetics
  10. Laboratory and experimental animals
  11. Mammals
  12. Mathematics and statistics
  13. Mice
  14. quantitative traits
  15. Rodents
  16. statistical analysis
  17. strains