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Assistive Device Use among Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Profile of Canadians Using Hearing, Vision, and Mobility Devices in the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging

By Yoko Ishigami, Jeffrey Jutai, Susan Kirkland

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Abstract

There is increasing recognition that using assistive devices can support healthy aging. Minimizing discomfort and loss of function and increasing independence can have a substantial impact physically, psychologically, and financially on persons with functional impairments and resulting activity limitations, as well as on caregivers and communities. However, it remains unclear who uses assistive devices and how device use can influence social participation. The current analysis used CLSA baseline data from 51,338 older adults between the ages of 45 and 85. Measures of socio-demographic, health, and social characteristics were analyzed by sex and age groups. Weighted cross-tabulations were used to report correlations between independent variables and assistive device use for hearing, vision, and mobility. We found that assistive device use was higher among those who were of older age, had less education, were widowed, had lower income, and had poorer health. Assistive devices were used differently according to sex and social participation, providing insight into assistive device use for the well-being of older adults and their families.

Publication Title Canadian Journal on Aging
Volume 40
Issue 1
Pages 23-38
ISBN/ISSN 07149808
Publisher Cambridge University Press
DOI 10.1017/S0714980819000692
Language English
Author Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia ; Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences and LIFE Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario ; Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia; Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia ; Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
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Tags
  1. Age
  2. Aging
  3. Assistive Technology
  4. Canada
  5. Caregivers
  6. Comfort
  7. data
  8. Demography
  9. Gerontology
  10. Health problems
  11. Hearing
  12. Income
  13. Longitudinal studies
  14. Mobility
  15. Mobility Aids
  16. Native Americans
  17. Older adults
  18. Orthopedics
  19. participation
  20. Quality of life
  21. recording
  22. Social participation
  23. Techniques
  24. visual system
  25. Well-being