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Children of Oryx, Children of Crake: Human-Animal Relationships in Margaret Atwood's MaddAddam Trilogy

By Jessica C. Franken

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Abstract

Climate change and industrialization have introduced new tensions to human-animal interactions in the United States—tensions explored in Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam trilogy (2003-2013). Tying the world of the novels to real-life trends, I examine MaddAddam’s portrayal of animals as commodities and objects of consumption, both literal and metaphorical; uncover sites of animal agency; and identify examples of liminality, “becoming-animal,” “becoming-with animal,” and symbiosis. I urge readers to move beyond both apocalyptic resignation and ecotopian naïveté, using MaddAddam as an inspiration for more thoughtful engagements among humans, animals, and the environment.

Submitter

Marcy Wilhelm-South

Purdue University

Date 2014
Pages 99
Degree Master of Liberal Studies
URL https://hdl.handle.net/11299/168127
Language English
University University of Minnesota
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Tags
  1. Animal roles
  2. Animal science
  3. Human-animal relationships
  4. Literature
  5. open access
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  1. open access