You are here: Home / Journal Articles / 'Tracking Together'—Simultaneous Use of Human and Dog Activity Trackers: Protocol for a Factorial, Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial / About

'Tracking Together'—Simultaneous Use of Human and Dog Activity Trackers: Protocol for a Factorial, Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

By Wasantha Jayawardene, Lesa Huber, Jimmy McDonnell, Laurel Curran, Sarah Larson, Stephanie Dickinson, Xiwei Chen, Erika Pena, Aletha Carson, Jeanne Johnston

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

Dog-walkers are more likely to achieve moderate-intensity physical activity. Linking the use of activity trackers with dog-walking may be beneficial both in terms of improving the targeted behavior and increasing the likelihood of sustained use. This manuscript aims to describe the protocol of a pilot study which intends to examine the effects of simultaneous use of activity trackers by humans and their dogs on the physical activity level of humans and dogs. This study uses nonprobability sampling of dog owners of age 25–65 (N = 80) and involves four parallel groups in an observational randomized controlled trial with a 2 × 2 factorial design, based on use of dog or human activity trackers for eight weeks. Each group consists of dog-human duos, in which both, either or none are wearing an activity tracker for eight weeks. At baseline and end, all human subjects wear ActiGraph accelerometers that quantify physical activity for one week. Commercial activity trackers are used for tracking human and dog activity remotely. Additional measures for humans are body composition and self-reported physical activity. Dog owners also report dog’s weight and physical activity using a questionnaire. A factorial analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) is used to compare physical activity across the four groups from baseline to week-10.

Submitter

Marcy Wilhelm-South

Purdue University

Date 2021
Publication Title International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume 18
Issue 4
Pages 10
Publisher MDPI
DOI 10.3390/ijerph18041561
URL https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/18/4/1561
Language English
Additional Language English
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tags
  1. activity trackers
  2. Animal roles
  3. Dogs
  4. Mammals
  5. open access
  6. Pets and companion animals
  7. technology
Badges
  1. open access