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Here Doggy! It's Prayer Time: The Relationship Between God, Man, and Dog in the Fourteenth-century Margaret Hours

By Efi Mosseri

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Category Conference Papers
Abstract

A high degree of intimacy between humans and other animals is expressed in the keeping of animals as pet companions. This practice was common as early as Ancient Greece and Rome and regained popularity during the thirteenth century. In this period, dogs began to play a vital role in domestic life and so became a favourite pet among nobles in the fourteenth century. Contrary to hunting or working dogs, pet dogs were given names and had privileges within their owners’ households. By virtue of their special status, they even accompanied their owners to church, despite the condemnation of this practice by church officials. This reflects a special relationship that was established during the fourteenth century between man, animals, and the divine. This paper focuses on the trilateral connection of God, humans, and dogs in a book of hours known as the Margaret Hours (c. 1320), where a dog and the praying book owner are depicted side-by-side in various illustrations. Special attention is given to a framed miniature presenting the lady, in prayer, next to a dog and a collared bird. Through this miniature, this paper will demonstrate the participation of both the lady and the dog in prayer.

Submitter

Marcy Wilhelm-South

Purdue University

Date 2020
Pages 46-66
Publisher Leiden University Centre for the Arts in Society
Conference Title Journal of the Lucas Graduate Conference
URL https://hdl.handle.net/1887/123085
Language English
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Tags
  1. Animal roles
  2. Dogs
  3. Human-animal relationships
  4. Mammals
  5. open access
  6. Pets and companion animals
  7. Religions
Badges
  1. open access