The HABRI Foundation is calling for research proposals to investigate the health outcomes of pet ownership and/or animal-assisted activity or therapy, both for the people and the animals involved. To learn more, visit https://habri.org/grants/funding-opportunities/ close

 
You are here: Home / Journal Articles / "Don't be so Modest, You're a Rat": Anthropomorphism, Social Class, and Renegotiation in Ratatouille and Bee Movie / About

"Don't be so Modest, You're a Rat": Anthropomorphism, Social Class, and Renegotiation in Ratatouille and Bee Movie

By Reuben Dylan Fong

View Link (HTM)

Licensed under

Category Journal Articles
Abstract

One of the common fantasy stories involving anthropomorphized nonhuman animals in animated children's films is of humans and animals discovering they can communicate as equals. The human-animal relationship in the premise of these films exemplifies the idea of questioning and renegotiating ingrained social barriers. This article will analyze two such films (Brad Bird's 2007 film, Ratatouille, and Simon J. Smith and Steve Hickner's 2007 film, Bee Movie) using existing empirical research in child developmental psychology. I posit that these films use anthropomorphized animals and humans as allegories are often framed as ethnic stereotypes because children have a strong fluency of ethnic stereotypes from a young age. While these stories are ostensibly about the disassembling of social barriers, Ratatouille and Bee Movie ultimately model a heavy regulation on social mobility which largely reinforces existing status quos of class difference.

Submitter

Marcy Wilhelm-South

Purdue University

Date 2021
Publication Title Animalia
Volume 5
Issue 1
Pages 8
URL https://www.animaliajournal.org/_files/ugd/c128e1_339a372fab3e429392b7deef2d1d965f.pdf
Language English
Additional Language English
Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Tags
  1. Animal roles
  2. Anthropomorphism
  3. Human-animal relationships
  4. Media
  5. open access
Badges
  1. open access