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  1. Analysis of Factors Relating to Companion Rabbits Relinquished to Two United Kingdom Rehoming Centers

    Contributor(s): Ellis, Clare F., McCormick, Wanda, Tinarwo, Ambrose

    Rabbits are a common companion animal in the United Kingdom, and some reports have suggested that large numbers are relinquished to rehoming centers each year. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of rabbits relinquished to 2 UK rehoming centers and explore reasons given for...

  2. Analysis of Dog Adoption Success and Failure Using Surveys With Vignettes

    Contributor(s): Hill, Stephen E., Murphy, Nancy C.

    Adoption success of dogs who serve as companion animals was analyzed via surveys with vignettes. The researchers administered surveys with vignettes to animal shelter employees, veterinarians, and other animal-care professionals in Eastern North Carolina. Logistic and linear regression analyses...

  3. Advances in Applied Zoo Animal Welfare Science

    Contributor(s): Ward, Samantha J., Sherwen, Sally, Clark, Fay E.

    Nonhuman animal welfare science is the scientific study of the welfare state of animals that attempts to make inferences about how animals feel from their behavior, endocrine function, and/or signs of physical health. These welfare measurements are applicable within zoos yet inherently more...

  4. Activity Budgets of Captive Cape Fur Seals (Arctocephalus pusillus) Under a Training Regime

    Contributor(s): Wierucka, Kaja, Siemianowska, Sonia, Woźniak, Marta, Jasnosz, Katarzyna, Kieliszczyk, Magdalena, Kozak, Paulina, Sergiel, Agnieszka

    Ethograms and time budgets are crucial for the behavioral assessment of nonhuman animals in zoos, and they serve as references for welfare research. This study was conducted to obtain detailed time budgets of trained Cape fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus) in captivity, to evaluate variations of...

  5. Ability of the Public to Recognize Dogs Considered to Be Dangerous under the Dangerous Dogs Act in the United Kingdom

    Contributor(s): Webster, Catherine A., Farnworth, Mark J.

    Canine aggression came into the public eye in the United Kingdom in the late 1980s prompting enactment of the UK Dangerous Dogs Act , which prohibits four breeds or “types” of dogs. The act faced strong opposition surrounding correct identification of prohibited dogs. A questionnaire was...

  6. Abandonment of Dogs and Cats: Public Opinions as Population Management Indicators

    Contributor(s): Baquero, Oswaldo Santos, Chiozzotto, Evelyn Nestori, Garcia, Rita de Cassia Maria, Amaku, Marcos, Ferreira, Fernando

    This study involved characterizing public opinions on selected issues related to the abandonment of dogs and cats in Votorantim, São Paulo, Brazil. This goal was achieved by applying multiple correspondence analysis to answers recorded in questionnaires of a population-based survey. The results...

  7. A Qualitative Analysis of Pets as Suicide Protection for Older People

    Contributor(s): Young, Janette, Bowen-Salter, Holly, O’Dwyer, Lisel, Stevens, Kristen, Nottle, Carmel, Baker, Amy

    An unanticipated finding during research on the role that pets play in the health of older adults was that pets had protected some from suicide. Given that older people are more vulnerable to fatal first attempts, understanding protective factors in this population is vital. Twelve older adults...

  8. Why Did I Share My Life With Glucio? A Life Course Approach to Explaining Pet Ownership Motivations in Late Adulthood

    Contributor(s): Uribe, Ana Cecilia Reyes

    The main purpose of this study was to gain insight into the motivations for pet ownership in late adulthood using a life course approach. A qualitative research methodology based on deductive thematic analysis was applied to examine the accounts given by 21 pet owners living in Mexico: 14 women...

  9. Animals and Pastoral Groups in the Mountainous Ömerli District of Southeast Anatolia

    Contributor(s): Siddiq, Abu Bakar, Şanlı, Süleyman

    Southeast Anatolia has been an ideal place for pastoralism since the Neolithic period. However, there is a lack of information on human–animal relationships from both archaeological settlements and contemporary societies in the region. Through ethnographic fieldwork and exploratory case studies...

  10. The Relationship Between Pet Attachment, Life Satisfaction, and Perceived Stress: Results from a South African Online Survey

    Contributor(s): Roux, Marieanna C. le, Wright, Simonne

    Pets are an important part of many pet owners’ lives, yet very little is known about this complex relationship within a South African context. Most of the research on pet attachment and pet ownership stems from developed countries such as the USA. The present study used an online survey to...

  11. The Effectiveness of Equine-Facilitated Psychotherapy in Adolescents with Serious Emotional Disturbances

    Contributor(s): Roberts, Hanna, Honzel, Nikki

    Adolescents with serious emotional disturbances (SED) are a particularly difficult population to treat owing to high comorbidity rates of anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress, and behavioral conduct disorders. The current study compared the effectiveness of equine-facilitated psychotherapy...

  12. The Effects of Dogs on Learning: A Meta-Analysis

    Contributor(s): Reilly, Katie M., Adesope, Olusola O., Erdman, Phyllis

    Integrating dogs into learning environments is becoming more prevalent as growing evidence demonstrates positive benefits of dogs on human functioning. To date, there is no known quantitative review of research that specifically investigates the impacts of dogs within school/classroom...

  13. The Relationship Between Neuroticism Facets, Conscientiousness, and Human Attachment to Pet Cats

    Contributor(s): Reevy, Gretchen M., Delgado, Mikel M.

    Gaining knowledge about the diverse correlates of human–pet attachment will help us better understand the nature of this bond. Previous research found that the personality dimensions of neuroticism and conscientiousness positively predicted human attachment to multiple types of pets. To address a...

  14. Attitudes to Animal Abuse in Veterinary Practice in Poland

    Contributor(s): Pręgowski, Michał Piotr, Cieślik, Sandra

    Over the last two decades, animal abuse and neglect, as well as the relationship between animal abuse and domestic violence, have been the subject of numerous academic inquiries. Existing studies on this issue have primarily been conducted in Anglo-Saxon and Western European countries, and little...

  15. Effects of Human–Dog Interactions on Salivary Oxytocin Concentrations and Heart Rate Variability: A Four-Condition Cross-Over Trial

    Contributor(s): Powell, Lauren, Edwards, Kate M., Michael, Scott, McGreevy, Paul, Bauman, Adrian, Guastella, Adam J., Drayton, Bradley, Stamatakis, Emmanuel

    Dog ownership is often advocated for its potential benefits to human health, with changes to oxytocin and autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity proposed as possible underlying mechanisms. The aims of the current study were to a) examine the effect of two common types of human–dog interactions...

  16. Characteristics of Student– Dog Interaction during a Meet-and-Greet Activity in a University-Based Animal Visitation Program

    Contributor(s): Pendry, Patricia, Kuzara, Stephanie, Gee, Nancy R.

    The use of university-based Animal Visitation Programs (AVPs)—programs aimed at reducing student stress through human–animal interaction (HAI)—has increased. Implementation has expanded despite our limited understanding about program effects on student and animal wellbeing. Moreover, little is...

  17. Belief in Pigs’ Capacity to Suffer: An Assessment of Pig Farmers, Veterinarians, Students, and Citizens

    Contributor(s): Peden, Rachel S. E., Camerlink, Irene, Boyle, Laura A., Loughnan, Steve, Akaichi, Faical, Turner, Simon P.

    Intensive animal production practices lead to animal suffering worldwide. This study examined whether farmers cope with the negative impact of farming practices on their animals by ascribing them less capacity to suffer compared with other species. Most people like eating meat but find animal...

  18. Relationships Between People with Cancer and Their Companion Animals: What Helps and Hinders

    Contributor(s): Nitkin, Patricia, Buchanan, Marla J.

    This qualitative research project examined the impact of the relationships between persons with cancer and their companion animals. The goal of this study was to explore the helpful and unhelpful aspects of having a companion animal for people with cancer dealing with the emotional challenges...

  19. The Impact of Owning a Guide Dog on Owners’ Quality of Life: A Longitudinal Study

    Contributor(s): McIver, Sara, Hall, Sophie, Mills, Daniel S.

    Individuals with visual impairments often report low quality of life (QOL), increased depression, and reduced functionality. Trained assistance dogs have been shown to help improve QOL and daily functioning of individuals affected by chronic conditions, but these studies have been largely...

  20. Australian and New Zealand Veterinary Students’ Ranking of Issues in Aquatic Animal Welfare and Ethics

    Contributor(s): Lloyd, Janice K. F., Collins, Teresa, Cornish, Amelia R., Degeling, Christopher, Fawcett, Anne, Fisher, Andrew D., Freire, Rafael, Hazel, Susan J., Hood, Jennifer, Johnson, Jane, Phillips, Clive J. C., Stafford, Kevin J., Tzioumis, Vicky, McGreevy, Paul D.

    The welfare of aquatic animals is receiving increasing attention around the world, and this should be reflected in the veterinary curricular. Veterinary students in Australia and New Zealand ranked the importance of five pre-selected topics on aquatic animal welfare and ethical issues for newly...