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  1. What big teeth you have: an educational approach to wolf conservation

    Contributor(s): Nastassja Brinker

    As the subject of deep-seated cultural and historical antipathies and revulsion, the wolf presents a unique challenge for wildlife educators working to promote its conservation and value as a species while they are forced to combat the systematic persecution and eradication it has suffered...

  2. What Could Your Dog Be Carrying? - Zoonotic Enteric Bacteria in Pet Dogs in Ontario: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Antimicrobial Resistance

    Contributor(s): Erin Kathleen Leonard

    In this study we investigated the prevalence of selected zoonotic pathogens (Salmonella and Campylobacter) and antimicrobial resistant bacteria (Salmonella spp. and generic Escherichia coli) in client-owned dogs in Southwestern Ontario. The pet-related risk factors for shedding Salmonella spp.,...

  3. What do Therapists Think is the Uniqueness of Animal Assisted Therapy that Engages Children?

    Contributor(s): Megan Marie Mensink, Sarah M. Ferguson (adviser)

    What do therapists believe is the uniqueness of animal assisted therapy that engages children? This is the main question this research aims to answer. The purpose of this study was to get the opinions of therapists on how animal assisted therapies benefit children. In this qualitative study, the...

  4. What is the experience of having a loving bond with a horse ?

    Contributor(s): Breznak, Jessica Lynn

  5. What's a dog got to do with education? Illuminating what matters in education and in life.

    Contributor(s): Bernadette Nicholls

    In this thesis I analyse the students’ responses to Gus, an English Springer spaniel, whom I specifically trained as an education dog. I examine the students’ experiences from my Year 10 English, Year 10 Religious Education, Year 8 Religious Education and Year 7 Homeroom classes...

  6. What's in a Name: Effect of Breed Perceptions & Labeling on Attractiveness, Adoptions & Length of Stay for Pit-Bull-Type Dogs

    Contributor(s): Lisa Marie Gunter

    Previous research has indicated that certain breeds of dogs stay longer in shelters than others; however exactly how breed perception and identification influences potential adopters' decisions remains unclear. Current dog breed identification practices in animal shelters are often based upon...

  7. When euthanasia is an option : the experience of making end-of-life decisions for companion animals

    Contributor(s): Laurel Horn

    It's only a dog! You should just get another cat. You waited too long to take him to the vet as it is. These are some of the common attitudes and reactions that pet owners must often contend with when their companion animals die. Though they may be trying to be understanding and supportive,...

  8. When horses heal: a qualitative inquiry into Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy

    Contributor(s): Esbjorn, Ritu Janice

  9. When reading gets Ruff : understanding the literacy experiences of children engaged in a canine-assisted reading program.

    Contributor(s): Emily Callahan Perkins

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate how the interactions that take place between therapy dogs and children during literacy activities change children's attitudes towards reading in one urban charter school. The research drew on both the sociocultural approach to literacy...

  10. When the Bond Breaks: Variables that Influence Grief Following Companion Animal Loss

    Contributor(s): Cowling, Dawn

    An online survey investigated variables that are related to grief, guilt and loneliness following companion animal loss. Variables of interest were: relationship, species, time since death, type of death, attachment, social support, and demographic variables. Female and male participants over...

  11. When the bond is broken : companion animal death and adult human grief

    Contributor(s): Bloom, Mary M.

  12. Where the Wild Horses Roam: The Cross-Cultural Debate over the Fate of Wild Horses on Yakama Tribal Lands

    Contributor(s): Jennifer Smith

    The horse has been recognized as an integral part of the Yakama people‘s culture for the better part of the last two centuries. However, in recent decades, the wild horse population on Yakama tribal lands has significantly increased, leading to a polarizing debate over their management. The...

  13. Where the wild things are: The benefit of an integrated zoo-based program for the social development of young children

    Contributor(s): Frankie, Sara Morse

  14. White Blood Cell Counts, Parasite Prevalence, and Plasma Cortisol Levels of Dogs in a County Animal Shelter: Changes over Days and Impact of a Program of Repeated Human Interaction

    Contributor(s): Emily S. Dudley

    Animal shelter housing is highly stressful for a dog, compromising welfare and leading to undesirable behaviors and unknown health consequences. We documented the changes in circulating numbers of white blood cells, plasma cortisol, and fecal parasite shedding of dogs housed for 10 days at a...

  15. Who let the dogs in: a narrative examination into the need for animal assisted intervention based programming for youth residential treatment centers

    Contributor(s): Paul Wright

    Throughout my career working with youth, it has been my dream to use animals for  therapy in residential treatment settings. This project is an effort to make that dream a  reality. It is a journey through the events and experiences in my life that have shaped my  views. What I...

  16. Who Let the Therapy Dogs Out? The Impacts of Therapy Dog Assisted Activites on Undergraduate Students' Perceived Stress Levels

    Contributor(s): Ashley Ann Asel

    This study had two major purposes. The first was to determine if therapy dogs played a significant role in helping students reduce the amount of stress they were experiencing while they were studying for their end of the semester final exams. Research suggests that when individuals are...

  17. Who's Afraid of the Big, Bad Coyote? A Survey of Messaging and Existing Attitudes in the National Capital Region

    Contributor(s): Megan Draheim

    Coyotes are relatively recent arrivals to the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. In an  effort to understand and obtain baseline data about existing attitudes, a survey was  conducted in 2006. Most respondents had neutral attitudes towards coyotes, which might  be in part due to...

  18. Whole transcriptome response of chicken spleen and peripheral blood leukocytes to avian pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Contributor(s): Erin Elizabeth Sandford, Susan J. Lamont (adviser)

    A greater understanding of the immune response after infection can form the necessary foundation of knowledge needed to enhance immunity through genetic selection. Whole genome microarrays allow for comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome. The transcriptomic responses of spleen and peripheral...

  19. Why, what and how to teach ethics to veterinary students in Europe

    Contributor(s): Manuel Duarte Pimentel Ferreira de Magalhães Sant’Ana

    The teaching of ethics is now commonly included as part of undergraduate veterinary medical education in Europe. Despite the wide recognition that veterinary students need to acquire ethical competences, there is limited empirical research examining the reasons for teaching ethics (why), the...

  20. Widening the Circle of Empathy through Humane Education: A Qualitative Study with Diverse and At-Risk Children

    Contributor(s): Jennie Marie Warmouth

    This study examines the socio-emotional and cognitive impact of a three-month literacy centered humane education program on one second-grade classroom of socio-culturally and linguistically diverse children using a qualitative research design. Twenty-five children, ages 7-8 years, participated in...