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  1. Grief severity: A comparison between human and companion animal death

    Grief severity was investigated and compared amongst 50 participants aged 18 to 65 years who had experienced the death of a human (n = 35) or the death of a companion animal (n = 15). Participants were recruited in Australia and completed an on-line self-report questionnaire package, measuring...

  2. Equine-assisted interventions for veterans with service-related health conditions: a systematic mapping review

    BACKGROUND: Evidence-based treatments for service-related health conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and traumatic brain injury (TBI) are not effective for all veterans. Equine-assisted interventions are emerging as an additional treatment modality, but little is...

  3. Dog Ownership and Training Reduces Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms and Increases Self-Compassion Among Veterans: Results of a Longitudinal Control Study

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to measure the potential impact of a therapeutic dog ownership and training program for Veterans with symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Design: The study used a quasi-experimental design with two cohorts of Veterans-a dog owner-trainer intervention and a...

  4. Complexities of Using Wild versus Captive Activity Budget Comparisons for Assessing Captive Primate Welfare

    Activity budget comparisons between groups or individuals in the wild and those in captivity are commonly used to determine the range of wild-type behaviors that nonhuman animals in captivity perform. These comparisons are conducted with the view that individuals displaying a greater range of...

  5. Companion Animals in Natural Disasters: A Scoping Review of Scholarly Sources

    During a disaster, people may make evacuation decisions based on their companion animal’s welfare, therefore exposing themselves, their companion animals, and emergency responders to increased risk for injury or death. The loss and suffering of companion animals in disasters causes deep distress,...

  6. Baseline Knowledge of Potential Pet Toxins among the US General Public

    In 2014, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty toAnimals Animal Poison Control Center fielded more than 167,000cases of potential nonhuman animal toxicosis. Concomitantly, thereremain limited free and reputable veterinary toxicology resourcesavailable for companion-animal (pet)...

  7. Relationships Between People with Cancer and Their Companion Animals: What Helps and Hinders

    This qualitative research project examined the impact of the relationships between persons with cancer and their companion animals. The goal of this study was to explore the helpful and unhelpful aspects of having a companion animal for people with cancer dealing with the emotional challenges...

  8. Lancaster Pet Cemetery Memorial Plaques 1951–2018: An Analysis of Inscriptions

    Individuals in many cultures have a close relationship with their pets and think of them not only as companion animals but also as family. Research on the ways in which people memorialize their deceased pets has become increasingly important, and pet cemetery gravestone inscriptions have provided...

  9. Human-Directed Empathy and Attitudes Toward Animal Use: A Survey of Spanish Veterinary Students

    Veterinary practitioners are thought of as guardians of animal health and wellbeing, and are considered important in the development of policies on animals. Measuring veterinary students’ attitudes toward animals and animal use is needed when assessing the effectiveness of education programs...

  10. Veterinary Students’ Beliefs About Animal Sentience: What Role Does Gender Play?

    Across a 15-year period, annual cohorts of first-year veterinary science students (n = 1,380; 77% female) at a British university completed the Belief in Animal Sentience (BiAS) questionnaire, in which they reported their beliefs about the sentience (capacity to feel) of ten species: dogs, cats,...

  11. (Un)Regulated Relations: An Ethnographic Perspective of Dog Ownership on Isla Mujeres, Mexico

    This paper examines the regulation and management of dogs in the Mexican municipality of Isla Mujeres. It shows how dogs, on Isla Mujeres, are managed under a neoliberal framework of a decentralized government which relies on the personal responsibility of citizens and the outsourcing of...

  12. How Ethical Ideologies Relate to Public Attitudes toward Animals: The Dutch Case

    Ethical ideologies, which include dimensions of idealism and relativism, are often involved in the process of decision-making regarding operational and economic research. However, the study of the role of ethical ideologies concerning public attitudes toward animals has been largely neglected....

  13. Belief in Animal Mind among Spanish Primary School Children

    Beliefs concerning the mental experiences of nonhuman animals have been related to how people treat, see, and take care of nonhuman animals. Whereas this issue has been the subject of several studies on adults, few have been conducted with children. Taking advantage of a recently published scale,...

  14. Measuring the Strength of Human–Animal Bonds in Zoos

    Repeated interactions within individual human and animal dyads can lead to the establishment of human–animal relationships (HARs), which may vary in quality from good to bad, defined in terms of the positivity (e.g., friendly contact, play) or negativity (e.g., aggression) of the interactions on...

  15. Exploring the Meaning and Experience of Chronic Pain with People Who Live with a Dog: A Qualitative Study

    Pain is a significant burden for those with chronic disease and negatively impacts quality of life, causing disability and substantial work and health-care costs. Chronic pain has been identified as one of the most important current and future causes of morbidity and disability across the world....

  16. Measuring Quality of Life in Owners of Companion Dogs: Development and Validation of a Dog Owner-specific Quality of Life Questionnaire

    Numerous studies have examined the link between companiondog ownership and improved physical or psychological health outcomes; however, few have examined the association between dog ownership and owners’ overall wellbeing or quality of life (QOL). Moreover, the potential for dog ownership to...

  17. Normalization, Social Bonding, and Emotional Support— A Dog’s Effect within a Prison Workshop for Women

    A fundamental tenet of the Danish Prison System is the principle of normalization, meaning that prisons are organized in such a way that the conditions within the walls more or less resemble the conditions outside them. When prison conditions differ as little as possible from normal daily life on...

  18. Using Attachment Theory and Social Support Theory to Examine and Measure Pets as Sources of Social Support and Attachment Figures

    Companion animals are increasingly being recognized by society as beneficial to our health and considered by many owners as authentic and affectional family members. Human relationship theories help us to understand the emotional and supportive aspect of the human– companion animal bond. This...

  19. Integrating Concern for Animals into Personal Values

    Recent scholarship in human–animal relationships demonstrates that new theoretical insights emerge when these relationships are seriously considered. We suggest that the most prominent measures of values in the environmental decision-making research literature, the Schwartz approach, may not...

  20. Evaluating the Impact of a Humane Education Summer-Camp Program on School-Aged Children's Relationships with Companion Animals

    This study evaluated the impact of children's participation in a five-day humane education summer-camp program on the quality of their relationships with and treatment of companion animals. We measured changes from pre- to post-program in 77 children (50 girls, 27 boys) aged 6–12 years. The...