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  1. Tail and ear biting lesions in pigs: an epidemiological study

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    Tail and ear biting lesions have a negative effect both on the animal welfare status of pigs (Sus scrofus) and the economical revenue of the pig farm. Tail biting behaviour is an unpredictable, abnormal behaviour that is thought to have a multifactorial origin. On-farm factors influencing tail...

  2. Introducing dogs into kennels: production of social tendencies to facilitate integration

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    Ethnological observations of the introduction of new charges into a large mixed sex group in a dog shelter, and the later behaviour of the dogs in the run, were used to investigate a method of early assessment of the dogs' reactions to the new situation. Subjects were divided qualitatively into 4...

  3. Enriching the metabolic cage: effects on rat physiology and behaviour

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    Metabolic cages are used for housing rats and mice for up to five days for collection of urine and/or faeces. The small, barren area of the metabolic cage compromises animal welfare as the animals lack a solid floor, shelter, nest material and social contact. We constructed and tested a...

  4. Consequences of enhancing environmental complexity for laboratory rodents - a review with emphasis on the rat

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    Enhancing the complexity of the environments of captive animals is often referred to as environmental enrichment, and aims to have positive effects on the animals' well-being. Such enrichments may have consequences both for so-called 'normal' behaviour and for the pathophysiology of the animals...

  5. Effects of physical activity and group size on animal welfare in laboratory rats

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether moderate physical activity and group size influence physical fitness, the level of social interactions in the home cage and rats' performance in the Elevated Plus Maze and a handling test. Forty-eight male Sprague Dawley rats were kept in groups of...

  6. Song development in birds: the role of early experience and its potential effect on rehabilitation success

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    Environmental conditions during the early life stages of birds can have significant effects on the quality of sexual signals in adulthood, especially song, and these ultimately have consequences for breeding success and fitness. This has wide-ranging implications for the rehabilitation protocols...

  7. Measuring thirst in broiler chickens

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    Freedom from thirst has been long considered of paramount importance for animal welfare, however a feasible and sensitive animal-based indicator to assess thirst, on-farm or at-slaughter, is not available. In this study, voluntary water consumption over time was investigated and validated as a...

  8. Comparison of indoor and captive, free-roaming management in golden-headed lion tamarins ( Leontopithecus chrysomelas ) at Zurich Zoo

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    Traditional husbandry practices for the public display of Callitrichidae involve strict separation of animals and public. An important consideration for the evaluation of such management is the occurrence of health problems and potential zoonotic risks. This study compared animal data and...

  9. The effect of feeding a high fibre diet on the welfare of sows housed in large dynamic groups

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    This study assessed the effect of increasing fibre levels in the concentrate ration on the welfare of sows housed in a large dynamic group. One hundred and twelve Large White x Landrace sows were allocated to one of two treatments over six replicates. Treatments were as follows: (i) High Fibre...

  10. Infrared thermography as a non-invasive method for detecting fear-related responses of cattle to handling procedures

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine whether maximum eye temperature, measured using infrared thermography (IRT), could be a non-invasive technique for detecting responses of cattle to handling procedures. Experiment one used six crossbred heifers randomly assigned to two groups in a...

  11. Infrared thermography as a non-invasive tool to study animal welfare

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    Growing public concern regarding animal welfare and consumer demand for humanely produced products have placed pressure on the meat, wool and dairy industries to improve and confirm the welfare status of their animals. This has increased the need for reliable methods of assessing animal welfare...

  12. Effects of perch design on behaviour and health of laying hens

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    EU-Directive 1999/74/EC stipulates that furnished cages and non-cage systems for laying hens should be provided with perches. This Directive allows for a wide variety in perch design features possibly affecting perch use and hen health. Perch material and shape mainly affect slipperiness and grip...

  13. Assessment of sheep welfare using on-farm registrations and performance data

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    Farm animal welfare is a societal concern, and the need exists for scientific protocols to assess welfare. This paper describes the development of a protocol to assess the welfare of sheep (Ovis aries) and its application in 36 farms in Norway. There were two parts to the protocol; the animal-...

  14. The use of a hand-held algometer as a method to measure mechanical nociceptive thresholds in sheep

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    The aim of this study was to explore the use of a hand-held algometer for the measurement of mechanical nociceptive thresholds (MNT) in sheep (Ovis aries). Twelve ewes were tested over three consecutive days by two operators, and MNTs were measured over six predetermined sites on both forelimbs...

  15. The effect of nose ringing on exploratory behaviour in gilts

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    Outdoor sows with nose rings can perform most of their natural behavioural activities except rooting. The prevention of rooting through surgical intervention (nose ringing) may be detrimental to welfare, although the behavioural and welfare consequences of rooting deprivation are not well...

  16. The effect of method of tail docking on tail-biting behaviour and welfare of pigs

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    The objective of this study was to explore the effects of tail docking and tail biting on pig welfare through an assessment of physiology and behaviour. In experiment 1, piglets were either tail docked using hot cautery iron (CAUT), blunt trauma cutters (BT), or their tails were left intact...

  17. The conservation-welfare nexus in reintroduction programmes: a role for sensory ecology. (Special Issue: Conservation and animal welfare.)

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    Since reintroduction programmes involve moving animals from captive or wild environments and releasing them into novel environments, there are sure to be a number of challenges to the welfare of the individuals involved. Behavioural theory can help us develop reintroductions that are better for...

  18. Computer-assisted enrichment for zoo-housed orangutans ( Pongo pygmaeus )

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    The study of environmental enrichment has identified a variety of effective forms of enrichment, but there are widespread problems associated with their use. Few forms of enrichment are cognitively challenging, and even the most effective often result in rapid habituation. This study examined the...

  19. The effect of the kennel environment on canine welfare: a critical review of experimental studies

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    Dogs can be held temporarily or permanently in kennels for a number of reasons, not necessarily for their own benefit. Although restrictive environments have been associated with poor welfare, priorities for research and change cannot be understood unless the various aspects of the kennel...

  20. Is quality of life a useful concept for companion animals?

    Contributor(s): Mahmoud Khaled Masa\'deh, Sheila E. Purdum (adviser)

    Although the term 'quality of life' (QoL) is not unfamiliar to veterinary surgeons, only recently has the scientific community attempted to measure it in farm and companion animals. Typically such studies have applied methodologies from the field of human health-related quality of life (HRQoL),...