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Tags: Abnormal behavior

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  1. Benefits of pair housing are consistent across a diverse population of rhesus macaques. (Special Issue: The welfare of laboratory primates.)

    Contributor(s):: Baker, K. C., Bloomsmith, M. A., Oettinger, B., Neu, K., Griffis, C., Schoof, V., Maloney, M.

  2. Comparing the relative benefits of grooming-contact and full-contact pairing for laboratory-housed adult female Macaca fascicularis. (Special Issue: The welfare of laboratory primates.)

    Contributor(s):: Lee, G. H., Thom, J. P., Chu, K. L., Crockett, C. M.

  3. Regurgitation and reingestion in bonobos (Pan paniscus): relationships between abnormal and social behavior

    Contributor(s):: Miller, L. J., Tobey, J. R.

  4. Use of video system and its effects on abnormal behaviour in captive Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata)

    Contributor(s):: Ogura, T.

  5. Human-directed aggression in the cat

    Contributor(s):: Curtis, T. M.

  6. Emotional stress release - a therapy option for atopy in dogs

    Contributor(s):: Luder, A.

    The emotional stress release is a creative and effective treatment option. Here in particular the interaction between man and animal will be identified to detect and to discuss possible projections of the keeper on the animal. The ESR is a methodology that is used for animals with recurrent...

  7. Psychopathology in great apes: concepts, treatment options and possible homologies to human psychiatric disorders

    Contributor(s):: Brune, M., Brune-Cohrs, U., McGrew, W. C., Preuschoft, S.

  8. All a mother's fault? Transmission of stereotypy in striped mice Rhabdomys

    Contributor(s):: Jones, M., Lierop, M. van, Pillay, N.

    Environmentally induced stereotypy is the most common abnormal behaviour in captive animals. However, not all animals housed in identically impoverished environments develop stereotypy, possibly because of differences in genetic predisposition. To investigate the transmission of stereotypy in...

  9. A survey of dog ownership in suburban Australia - conditions and behaviour problems

    Contributor(s):: Kobelt, A. J., Hemsworth, P. H., Barnett, J. L., Coleman, G. J.

    There has been an increasing emphasis in Australia on confining dogs to owner's properties (household backyards) as a solution to problems of dog aggression. Therefore, there is a need to determine the social and physical conditions that make up the dog's backyard environment and how these...

  10. Increased reproductive output in stereotypic captive Rhabdomys females: potential implications for captive breeding

    Contributor(s):: Jones, M. A., Lierop, M. van, Mason, G., Pillay, N.

    Captive animal populations can diverge considerably from populations in the wild, despite the animals not being deliberately domesticated. If the phenotypes which are of benefit in captivity are heritable, the genotypes of captive-stock can diverge swiftly and substantially from wild-stock. Using...

  11. Inappropriate behavior of potential guide dogs for the blind and coping behavior of human raisers

    Contributor(s):: Koda, N.

    Inappropriate behaviour of potential guide dogs (puppies; n=11) for the blind and coping behaviour of their adult female raisers (puppy walkers: PWs) were videotaped in their play situation at home from when the puppies were 2-11 or 12 months of age. The frequency of inappropriate behaviour...

  12. Divergent selection on feather pecking behaviour in laying hens ( Gallus gallus domesticus )

    Contributor(s):: Kjaer, J. B., Sorensen, P., Su, G.

    A selection experiment was initiated in 1996 in which selection for (HP line) and against (LP line) feather pecking was performed. The foundation stock was a White Leghorn layer strain established in 1970 and maintained since then as a random bred control line at the Institute. Six hatches were...

  13. Behavioural effects of environmental enrichment for individually caged rabbits

    Contributor(s):: Lidfors, L.

    The behavioural effects of providing 60 male New Zealand laboratory rabbits with one of four objects in their individual cages as environmental enrichment were investigated. The rabbits were assigned to one of 5 treatments by a random procedure; hay in a water bottle, grass-cubes, two gnawing...

  14. Intersucking in dairy cattle - review and questionnaire. (Special Issue: Behaviour and welfare of cattle)

    Contributor(s):: Lidfors, L., Isberg, L.

    Intersucking is an abnormal behaviour in dairy heifers and cows, and it is defined by one animal sucking the teat of another animal with the intention of sucking milk. The aim of this paper is to review earlier studies on intersucking in dairy cattle and to present results from a questionnaire...

  15. Applied animal behaviour science. (Special issue: Suckling)

    Contributor(s):: Lidfors, L., Svennersten-Sjaunja, K., Redbo, I.

    This supplement contains articles that focus on behavioural and physiological aspects of suckling and/or sucking in ruminants. Abnormal sucking behaviour, particularly cross-sucking and non-nutritive sucking, in calves are presented; and the effects of milk flow and milk volume, the presence of a...

  16. Do the stereotypies of pigs, chickens and mink reflect adaptive species differences in the control of foraging?

    Contributor(s):: Mason, G., Mendl, M.

    Species differences in food-related stereotypies and natural foraging behaviour are discussed, and evolutionary explanations for these species differences, and reasons why apparent species differences in stereotypy may be artefacts of husbandry are postulated.

  17. Geophagia in horses: a short note on 13 cases

    Contributor(s):: McGreevy, P. D., Hawson, L. A., Habermann, T. C., Cattle, S. R.

    Recorded in several species including humans, geophagia or soil eating has been observed in both wild and domesticated horses and has generally been regarded as an indication of nutritional deficiency or "boredom". Studies of soils consumed by different species have led to several theories as to...

  18. Behaviour patterns and time course of activity in dogs with separation problems

    Contributor(s):: Lund, J. D., Jorgensen, M. C.

    An analysis of video-recordings of 20 dogs with separation problems suggested that separation behaviour may be divided into; exploratory behaviour, object play including elements of predatory behaviour, destructive behaviour and vocalization. Elimination behaviour was only found in one case....

  19. Feather eating in layer pullets and its possible role in the aetiology of feather pecking damage

    Contributor(s):: McKeegan, D. E. F., Savory, C. J.

    Feather eating and its possible relationship with damaging pecking was examined in 144 pen-housed ISA Brown layer pullets. Collection and measurement of loose feathers in sample plots on 12 pen floors (feather were characterized as 'short' or 'long'), and examination of faecal droppings (eaten...

  20. The social transmission of feather pecking in laying hens: effects of environment and age

    Contributor(s):: McAdie, T. M., Keeling, L. J.

    Abnormal behaviours, such as feather pecking, can become an even greater problem if they spread through the flock. Domestic hens are a social species and it has been suggested that feather pecking behaviour can be socially transmitted from few feather pecking individuals to many. The purpose of...