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  1. A pilot study on the effects of a change in behavioural management on the behaviour of captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    Contributor(s):: Kranendonk, Godelieve, Schippers, Eva P.

    The debate on the use of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) in biomedical research has been ongoing for several years now. In 2012, the decision was made to retire a large number of laboratory chimpanzees in the United States of America. Relocation of these animals to sanctuaries, rescue centres, and...

  2. Novelty exploration, baseline cortisol level and fur-chewing in farm mink with different intensities of stereotypic behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Svendsen, Pernille M., Palme, Rupert, Malmkvist, Jens

    The present study aimed to examine the extent to which abnormal behaviours, stereotypic behaviour and fur-chewing, commonly used indicators of reduced welfare, are interrelated and linked to other welfare indicators in mink. Three groups were used based on behavioural observations, mink with no...

  3. How much is enough? The amount of straw necessary to satisfy pigs’ need to perform exploratory behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Pedersen, Lene J., Herskin, Mette S., Forkman, Björn, Halekoh, Ulrich, Kristensen, Kristian M., Jensen, Margit B.

    Since 10 years, EU-legislation states that ‘pigs must have permanent access to sufficient quantity of material to enable proper investigation and manipulation activities’. While much research has focused on which materials ‘enable proper investigation and manipulation activities’, little has been...

  4. Chimpanzees use multiple strategies to limit aggression and stress during spatial density changes

    Contributor(s):: Duncan, Luke Mangaliso, Jones, Megan Anne, van Lierop, Mathew, Pillay, Neville

    The regulation of aggression in captive animals is an important welfare concern. Captive environments typically provide limited space for animals and many species exhibit heightened aggression in response to spatial restriction. However, primates appear to regulate aggression under these...

  5. Tail biting in fattening pigs: Associations between frequency of tail biting and other abnormal behaviours

    Contributor(s):: Brunberg, Emma, Wallenbeck, Anna, Keeling, Linda J.

    This study investigated the association between tail biting (TB) and other abnormal behaviours in a group of non-tail docked pigs. Behavioural data were collected from 742 pigs housed on a commercial farm. The prevalence of performed and received TB, belly nosing, bar biting, ear biting and...

  6. Early rearing interacts with temperament and housing to influence the risk for motor stereotypy in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    Contributor(s):: Vandeleest, Jessica J., McCowan, Brenda, Capitanio, John P.

    Laboratory and zoo housed non-human primates sometimes exhibit abnormal behaviors that are thought to reflect reduced well-being. Previous research attempted to identify risk factors to aid in the prevention and treatment of these behaviors, and focused on demographic (e.g. sex or age) and...

  7. Cross-sucking by dairy calves may become a habit or reflect characteristics of individual calves more than milk allowance or weaning

    Contributor(s):: de Passillé, Anne Marie, Borderas, Fernando, Rushen, Jeffrey

    To examine the effects of milk allowance and weaning age on cross-sucking, 45 dairy calves were housed in groups of nine and fed milk and grain-based starter feed from automated feeders and allocated to three treatment groups: (A) Low-Milk Early-Weaned (fed 6L/d of milk until weaned at 47 d of...

  8. Comparing the relative benefits of grooming-contact and full-contact pairing for laboratory-housed adult female Macaca fascicularis

    Contributor(s):: Lee, Grace H., Thom, Jinhee P., Chu, Katherine L., Crockett, Carolyn M.

    Tactile social contact is the most effective form of environmental enrichment for promoting normal behavior in captive primates. For laboratory macaques housed indoors, pair housing is the most common method for socialization. Pairs can be housed either in full contact (FC), or in protected...

  9. How environmental enrichment affects behavioral and glucocorticoid responses in captive blue-and-yellow macaws (Ara ararauna)

    Contributor(s):: de Almeida, Ana Claudia, Palme, Rupert, Moreira, Nei

    Captive animals are susceptible to chronic stress due to restricted space, lack of hiding places, presence of visitors, or the lack of resources that promote physical and mental stimuli. In birds, chronic stress can promote stereotypes, self-mutilation, feather picking, chewing on cage bars and...

  10. Animal-assisted dyadic therapy: A therapy model promoting development of the reflective function in the parent-child bond

    Contributor(s):: Shani, L.

  11. Taking it out on the dog: psychological and behavioral correlates of animal abuse proclivity

    Contributor(s):: Parfitt, C., Alleyne, E.

    There is a lack of research examining the criminogenic factors related to animal abuse perpetrated by adults, despite the high prevalence of this type of offending. A correlational study examining the factors related to two types of animal abuse proclivity was used. We found that childhood animal...

  12. Without stress at the veterinarian: make the visit in the veterinary practice cat-friendlyOhne Stress sum Tierarzt: Den Besuch in der Tierarztpraxis katzenfreundlich gestalten

    Contributor(s):: Melchers, V.

    This article describes how to reduce stress in cats presented at animal hospitals for routine and medical procedures.

  13. Prevention of undesirable behaviors in cats

  14. Behavior questions and answers

    Contributor(s):: Horwitz, D. F.

  15. Feline aggression directed toward people: causes and treatment

    Contributor(s):: Horwitz, D. F.

  16. A Systematic Review of Animal-Assisted Therapy on Psychosocial Outcomes in People with Intellectual Disability

    Contributor(s):: Maber-Aleksandrowicz, S., Avent, C., Hassiotis, A.

  17. Reconsidering coprophagy as an indicator of negative welfare for captive chimpanzees

    Contributor(s):: Hopper, Lydia M., Freeman, Hani D., Ross, Stephen R.

    For captive chimpanzees, 'abnormal' behaviours include behaviours observed only in captivity (i.e. species-atypical behaviours) and those that are performed at higher rates in captivity compared to in the wild. Both types are used as metrics for evaluating captive primates' welfare....

  18. The fearful, anxious, & worried pet

    Contributor(s):: Deporter, T.

  19. The Swedish Swan Lady: reaction to an apparent animal hoarding case

    Contributor(s):: Svanberg, I., Arluke, A.

    This study describes media and judicial reaction to the first publicly acknowledged case of animal hoarding in Sweden-a 60-year-old Swedish woman who purportedly "rescued" 150 swans over several years by bringing many back to her one-room apartment. Reports in the press and social media reflected...

  20. Abnormal behaviour and behavioural problems in stabled horses and their relationship to horse welfare: a comparative review.

    Contributor(s):: G.j. Mason, J. Cooper

    Many behaviours in domestic animals, such as the ‘stable vices’ of horses, are treated because they are considered undesirable for economic or cultural reasons, and not because the activity affects the horse’s quality of life. The impact of a behaviour on the human reporter is...