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  1. Motivational and physiological analysis of the causes and consequences of non-nutritive sucking by calves

    Contributor(s):: Passille, A. M. de, Rushen, J.

    Non-nutritive sucking by calves of an artificial, dry teat was examined. Most non-nutritive sucking occurred directly after a meal and was elicited by the taste of milk. Increasing the volume of milk drunk did not reduce the amount of non-nutritive sucking, suggesting that the consumption of milk...

  2. Owner attitudes and dog behaviour problems

    Contributor(s):: O'Farrell, V.

    In the treatment of dog behaviour problems, assessment of the owner's attitude is usually an essential part of the diagnostic process. Questionnaire studies of groups of owners reveal wide variation in both degree and kind of owner attachment. Individual-centred methods such as the Kelly...

  3. Resting and social behaviour of dairy heifers housed in slatted floor pens with different sized bedded lying areas

    Contributor(s):: Nielsen, L. H., Mogensen, L., Krohn, C., Hindhede, J., Sorensen, J. T.

    The hypothesis that an increase in the straw bedded resting area for group housed heifers would increase synchronization of resting behaviour and decrease aggressive and abnormal behaviour was tested. An experiment was conducted on 2 Danish commercial dairy farms with 20 Danish Friesian heifers...

  4. Some aspects of milk that elicit non-nutritive sucking in the calf

    Contributor(s):: Passille, A. M. de, Rushen, J., Janzen, M.

    Male Holstein dairy calves were allowed to suck a non-nutritive teat after meals of either cow milk or milk replacer, and the amount of non-nutritive sucking that occurred during the 10 min following the meal was observed. There were no differences between milk and commercial milk replacer in the...

  5. Stereotyped pecking after feeding by restricted-fed fowls is influenced by meal size

    Contributor(s):: Savory, C. J., Mann, J. S.

    Growing broiler breeder chickens, fed routinely according to a programme of chronic food restriction, typically show increased pacing before feeding time and increased drinking and pecking at non-food objects afterwards. Expression of this behaviour is often stereotyped in form. In 2 experiments...

  6. Stereotypies in heifers are affected by feeding regime

    Contributor(s):: Redbo, I., Nordblad, A.

    The effect of giving different types of food which result in long or short feeding durations on stereotypy levels was studied. Forty-eight tethered heifers of the Swedish Red and White Breed, with an average age of 16 months, were subjected to the same treatment. During the first 2 weeks of the...

  7. Stimulation of serotonin (5-HT) activity reduces spontaneous stereotypies in female but not in male bank voles ( Clethrionomys glareolus ). Stereotyping female voles as a new animal model for human anxiety and mood disorders?

    Contributor(s):: Schoenecker, B., Heller, K. E.

    Spontaneously stereotyping female and male bank voles were injected daily (except on days assigned for monitoring behaviour) during 3 weeks with placebo, the neurolepticum clozapine or the SSRI antidepressant citalopram. Clozapine blocks dopamine (DA) receptors and acts as a partial serotonin...

  8. Survey of breeders' management of horses in Europe, North America and Australia: comparison of factors associated with the development of abnormal behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Parker, M., Goodwin, D., Redhead, E. S.

    An online survey of domestic horse breeders in the USA, UK, Australia, Canada and mainland Europe was carried out in order to examine management risk factors associated with the development of abnormal behaviour patterns. One hundred and forty breeders responded, and epidemiological results...

  9. The effects of weaning at 7, 14 and 28 days on piglet behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Worobec, E. K., Duncan, I. J. H., Widowski, T. M.

    The effects of very early weaning on piglet behaviour were investigated. In order to determine the effects of weaning age on piglet behaviour, litters of piglets were randomly assigned to be weaned at 7, 14 and 28 days of age. In each of 3 trials, piglets from 3 litters were mixed into 2 pens of...

  10. The social transmission of feather pecking in laying hens: effects of environment and age

    Contributor(s):: McAdie, T. M., Keeling, L. J.

    Abnormal behaviours, such as feather pecking, can become an even greater problem if they spread through the flock. Domestic hens are a social species and it has been suggested that feather pecking behaviour can be socially transmitted from few feather pecking individuals to many. The purpose of...

  11. The treatment of phobias in the dog

    Contributor(s):: Walker, R., Fisher, J., Neville, P.

    Since 1992 the authors have been compiling a casebook of detailed histories of canine phobia. As the work progressed modifications were made to the diagnostic criteria of anxiety in the dog. A combination of phenobarbitone with propranolol was used with perceived success supported by anecdotal...

  12. The use of mirrors for the control of stereotypic weaving behaviour in the stabled horse

    Contributor(s):: McAfee, L. M., Mills, D. S., Cooper, J. J.

    Weaving, a common locomotor stereotypy, is associated with social isolation in stabled horses. In this study we investigated the effect of provision of mirrors on weaving as this may have a similar effect to access to conspecifics. The behaviour of 6 known weavers, each in 1 of 3 locations within...

  13. Treating canine and feline behaviour problems and advising clients

    Contributor(s):: Turner, D. C.

    In this introductory paper, pet behaviour counselling and therapy is considered. A case is made for cooperation between veterinarians and trained pet behaviour advisors and for qualification of professionals working in the field. The general causes of behaviour problems, as well as general...

  14. Veterinary behavioural medicine. Selected papers presented at the 5th Biennial International Conference on Veterinary Behavioural Medicine, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, 14-16 July 2005

    Contributor(s):: Mills, D., Landsberg, G.

    This issue contains papers on normal behaviour and behavioural problems of dogs and approaches on how to manage these problems, including training and drug therapy.

  15. What time is feeding? How delays and anticipation of feeding schedules affect stump-tailed macaque behavior

    Contributor(s):: Waitt, C., Buchanan-Smith, H. M.

    Everyday animal care routines are essential to an animal's physical well-being but the effects of husbandry routines on the animals' psychological well-being are not often considered. The scheduling of animal care routines may have an important impact on how they are perceived by the animals...

  16. A behavioural comparison of New Zealand White rabbits ( Oryctolagus cuniculus ) housed individually or in pairs in conventional laboratory cages

    Contributor(s):: Chu, L. R., Garner, J. P., Mench, J. A.

    Despite their gregarious nature, rabbits used for research are often housed individually due to concerns about aggression and disease transmission. However, conventional laboratory cages restrict movement, and rabbits housed singly in these cages often perform abnormal behaviours, an indication...

  17. A behavioural study of scrapie-affected sheep

    Contributor(s):: Healy, A. M., Hanlon, A. J., Weavers, E., Collins, J. D., Doherty, M. L.

    The behaviour of 12 sheep, suspected of having scrapie, and 12 clinically normal animals from the Irish Republic was observed over a 6-day period [date not given]. Confirmation of the true disease status of the animals was made at postmortem using both histopathological and immunocytochemical...

  18. A note on aggression and cannibalism in laying hens following re-housing and re-grouping

    Contributor(s):: Cloutier, S., Newberry, R. C.

    The effects of being moved and mixed with strangers on the incidence of aggression and cannibalism in caged White Leghorn hens with intact beaks were examined. It was predicted that mixing of strangers would increase rates of aggression and cannibalism. Hens were reared in 16 stable groups of...

  19. An evaluation of response to novelty as a predictor of pecking tendency in laying hens

    Contributor(s):: Albentosa, M. J., Glen, E., Leeb, C., Whittaker, X., Nicol, C. J.

    Selective breeding against feather pecking in laying hens depends on identification of individual birds with the lowest feather pecking activity. If certain behavioural traits are phenotypically and genetically associated with, or predictive of, feather pecking activity then tests for these...

  20. Behavior and cortisol levels of dogs in a public animal shelter, and an exploration of the ability of these measures to predict problem behavior after adoption

    Contributor(s):: Hennessy, M. B., Voith, V. L., Mazzei, S. J., Buttram, J., Miller, D. D., Linden, F.

    Behaviour and plasma cortisol levels were examined in puppies and juvenile/adult dogs admitted to a public animal shelter. A behavioural test was developed to assess the responses of the dogs to novel or threatening conditions. Factor analysis of the behavioural responses of 166 dogs on day 3 in...