The HABRI Central Team continues to monitor emerging research and information about the COVID-19 pandemic. Visit our collection of resources, https://habricentral.org/features/covid-19 close

 
You are here: Home / Tags / Abnormal behavior / All Categories

Tags: Abnormal behavior

All Categories (41-60 of 360)

  1. Self-biting in caged macaques: cause, effect, and treatment

    Contributor(s):: Reinhardt, V., Rossell, M.

    Injurious self-biting is one of the most serious problems in primate colonies (Niemeyer, Gray, & Stephen, 1996). "Approximately 10% of captive, individually-housed monkeys engage in the disturbing phenomenon of self-injurious behavior (SIB). To date, no adequate explanation or effective therapy...

  2. The effect of environmental manipulation on behavior, salivary cortisol, and growth of piglets weaned at 14 days of age

    Contributor(s):: Rodarte, L. F., Ducoing, A., Galindo, F., Romano, M. C., Valdez, R. A.

    Environmental enrichment can be a useful tool to reduce belly nosing behaviors in early weaned piglets. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of environmental enrichment on behavior, salivary cortisol, and productivity of piglets weaned at 14 days of age. The study assigned 112 piglets...

  3. Influence of enclosure size on the distances covered and paced by captive tigers ( Panthera tigris)

    Contributor(s):: Breton, G., Barrot, S.

    In the wild, tigers live in large individual territories ranging from 7 to 1000 km 2 depending on the region and prey abundance. However, in captivity, the animal's environment is strongly reduced, and the size of the enclosure provided varies between zoos. It has been shown that animals...

  4. Abnormal behaviour in captive sooty mangabeys

    Contributor(s):: Crast, J., Bloomsmith, M. A., Perlman, J. E., Meeker, T. L., Remillard, C. M.

    The influence of several factors on abnormal behaviour was investigated in 46 singly housed sooty mangabeys ( Cercocebus atys) (eight nursery-reared, 38 mother-reared), including self-injurious, self-directed, stereotypic locomotion, and faeces/urine-related behaviours (SIB, SDB, SL, FUR,...

  5. Additional foraging elements reduce abnormal behaviour - fur-chewing and stereotypic behaviour - in farmed mink ( Neovison vison)

    Contributor(s):: Malmkvist, J., Palme, R., Svendsen, P. M., Hansen, S. W.

    We investigated whether provision of additional appetitive and consummatory elements of foraging reduces baseline stress and abnormal behaviour - in terms of fur-chewing and stereotypic behaviour - in farmed mink. We studied 200 juveniles ( n=100 females and 100 males) during the 5-month growth...

  6. An evaluative review of theories: related to animal cruelty

    Contributor(s):: Gullone, E.

    The two dominant theories relating to animal cruelty are critically reviewed. These are the violence graduation hypothesis and the deviance generalization hypothesis. The outcomes indicate very high consistency with the broader antisocial behavior and aggression literature, which is large and...

  7. Equine assisted social work as a mean for authentic relations between clients and staff

    Contributor(s):: Carlsson, C., Ranta, D. N., Traeen, B.

    The purpose of this study was to explore, by qualitative methods, the meaning of equine-assisted social work (EASW) both to young women with self-harm problems and their staff in residential treatment. Data were collected by in-depth interviews with eight staff members and nine clients....

  8. Equine stereotypic behaviors: causation, occurrence, and prevention

    Contributor(s):: Sarrafchi, A., Blokhuis, H. J.

    There are strong suggestions that equine stereotypies are connected to poor welfare and a suboptimal management and/or stabling environment. Different forms of equine stereotypic behaviors have been described. Crib biting, weaving, and box walking are considered the most prevalent. Several...

  9. Inside behavior: puppy socialization: more than just exposure

    Contributor(s):: Martin, D., Martin, K. M.

    This article discusses the importance and benefits of socialization of puppies to prevent future behaviour problems and as additional income for veterinary hospitals that offer puppy socialization classes.

  10. Management, health, and abnormal behaviors of horses: a survey in small equestrian centers in Brazil

    Contributor(s):: Leme, D. P., Parsekian, A. B. H., Kanaan, V., Hotzel, M. J.

    Care conditions of horses housed in small equestrian establishments and the occurrence of health and behavioral problems were assessed in 197 animals. Based on questionnaires and direct observations of the animals, it was noted that 8% of all animals were fed exclusively on pasture, whereas 92%...

  11. Puppy socialisation and the prevention of behavioural problems

    Dog owners are increasingly aware of the importance of socialisation in ensuring a puppy is friendly and well-adjusted. Socialisation involves meeting and having pleasant experiences and encounters with as many adults, children and animals as possible. It is important to stare socialisation...

  12. Small animal behavioral triage: a guide for practitioners

    Contributor(s):: Martin, K. M., Martin, D., Shaw, J. K.

    Behavioral concerns are the principal cause of a weakened human-animal bond and pet relinquishment. Triaging behavioral concerns and providing early intervention may be the difference between a patient remaining in its current home or relinquishment. Prevention and intervention behavior services...

  13. Animal Welfare Information Center Newsletter

    Contributor(s):: Gail Laule, Jacob Casper, Sebastian Heath, Robert Linnabary, Andrej Romanovsky

    The Animal Welfare Information Center Newsletter for Oct-Dec 1993. Contains "The Use of Behavioral Management Techniques to Reduce or Eliminate Abnormal Behavior" by Gail Laule, "Preparing the Farm and Farm Animals for Disasters by Jacob Casper, Sebastian E. Heath, and Robert D. Linnabary, and...

  14. Assessing the prevalence and characteristics of hair-plucking behaviour in captive western lowland gorillas ( Gorilla gorilla gorilla)

    Contributor(s):: Less, E. H., Kuhar, C. W., Lukas, K. E.

  15. Behavioral correlates and welfare implications of informal interactions between caretakers and zoo-housed chimpanzees and gorillas

    Contributor(s):: Chelluri, G. I., Ross, S. R., Wagner, K. E.

  16. Behavioural problems in dogs: handling and aggression

    Contributor(s):: Heath, S.

  17. Chimpanzees use multiple strategies to limit aggression and stress during spatial density changes

    Contributor(s):: Duncan, L. M., Jones, M. A., Lierop, M. van, Pillay, N.

  18. Housing of female mice in a new environment and its influence on post-surgical behaviour and recovery

    Contributor(s):: Jirkof, P., Cesarovic, N., Rettich, A., Arras, M.

  19. Human-directed canine aggression

    Contributor(s):: Dobson, J.

  20. Novelty exploration, baseline cortisol level and fur-chewing in farm mink with different intensities of stereotypic behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Svendsen, P. M., Palme, R., Malmkvist, J.