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  1. Improving the Welfare of a Zoo-Housed Male Drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus poensis) Aggressive Toward Visitors

    Contributor(s):: Martín, Olga, Vinyoles, Dolors, García-Galea, Eduardo, Maté, Carmen

    Improving the welfare of nonhuman animals in captivity and maintaining behavioral competence for future conservation purposes is of the highest priority for zoos. The behavior of an aggressive male drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus poensis) was assessed in Barcelona Zoo. The 2-year study presented in...

  2. Gibbon Aggression During Introductions: An International Survey

    Contributor(s):: Harl, Heather, Stevens, Lisa, Margulis, Susan W., Petersen, Jay

    Little is known regarding the prevalence of aggression seen during introductions of captive gibbons (Hylobatidae). In this study, an online survey was developed to quantify and collect contextual details regarding the frequency and types of aggression seen during introductions of captive gibbons...

  3. Cruelty to Animals in Turkish Children: Connections with Aggression and Empathy

    Contributor(s):: Akdemir, Seda, Gölge, Zeynep Belma

    This study explored the relationship between cruelty to animals, aggression, and empathy in primary school children. The relationship between pet ownership, love for animals in the family, and engaging in cruelty to animals was also investigated. The sample consisted of 1,248 students (633 girls,...

  4. Size does matter: The effect of enclosure size on aggression and affiliation between female New Zealand White rabbits during mixing

    Contributor(s):: Valuska, Annie J., Mench, Joy A.

    Social enrichment is increasingly employed to improve the welfare of laboratory animals, including rabbits. However, the high levels of injurious aggression that can occur when unfamiliar adult rabbits are introduced to one another are a barrier to implementing social housing. One factor that...

  5. Measuring chronic social tension in groups of growing pigs using inter-individual distances

    Contributor(s):: Turner, Simon P., Nath, Mintu, Horgan, Graham W., Edwards, Sandra A.

    Chronic social stress in pigs compromises immune function, reduces ADG, increases activity and skin lesions and affects feeding behaviour but to different extents in individuals and contemporary groups housed in the same way. Assessing the animals’ perception of chronic social stress is...

  6. Linking cortisol responsiveness and aggressive behaviour in gilthead seabream Sparus aurata: Indication of divergent coping styles

    Contributor(s):: Castanheira, Maria Filipa, Herrera, Marcelino, Costas, Benjamín, Conceição, Luís E. C., Martins, Catarina I. M.

    Farmed animals, including fish, often exhibit a pronounced individual variation in stress coping styles with proactive and reactive individuals differing in a variety of neuroendocrine and behavioural responses. In this study we disclosed that individual differences in cortisol responsiveness...

  7. Lateralization of agonistic and vigilance responses in Przewalski horses (Equus przewalskii)

    Contributor(s):: Austin, N. P., Rogers, L. J.

    Eye and limb preferences were scored in the closest undomesticated relative of Equus caballus using the same methods as used previously to study laterality in feral horses. Observations were made of 33 Przewalski horses (Equus ferus przewalskii) (male N=20, female N=13) living under natural...

  8. Interaction between sows’ aggressiveness post mixing and skin lesions recorded several weeks later

    Contributor(s):: Tönepöhl, Björn, Appel, Anne K., Voß, Barbara, König von Borstel, Uta, Gauly, Matthias

    Group housing of pigs leads inevitably to more or less serious agonistic interactions during the establishment of the social rank order of the group. In order to reduce the number of severe agonistic interactions and thus the negative effects on well-being and performance, the use of genetic...

  9. Human directed aggression in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris): Occurrence in different contexts and risk factors

    Contributor(s):: Casey, Rachel A., Loftus, Bethany, Bolster, Christine, Richards, Gemma J., Blackwell, Emily J.

    The consequence for dogs of showing aggression towards people is often euthanasia or relinquishment. Aggression is also a sign of compromised welfare in dogs, and a public health issue for people. The aims of this study were to estimate the numbers of dogs showing aggression to people in three...

  10. Hierarchy formation in newly mixed, group housed sows and management strategies aimed at reducing its impact

    Contributor(s):: Greenwood, Emma C., Plush, Kate J., van Wettere, William H. E. J., Hughes, Paul E.

    Aggression is at its highest when sows are first introduced to new animals and hierarchies are being established. Thus, methods to reduce aggression should focus on this period. The aggression that occurs during mixing results in physiological stress responses, which can have detrimental effects...

  11. Effect of hiding places, straw and territory on aggression in group-housed rabbit does

    Contributor(s):: Rommers, Jorine M., Reuvekamp, Berry J. F., Gunnink, Henk, de Jong, Ingrid C.

    Group-housing of rabbit does may be preferred from welfare point of view. However, group-housing causes agonistic behaviour which may cause severe injuries. Severe injuries may be prevented by offering hiding places for attacked does. Providing enrichment (straw) may reduce agonistic behaviour by...

  12. Chimpanzees use multiple strategies to limit aggression and stress during spatial density changes

    Contributor(s):: Duncan, Luke Mangaliso, Jones, Megan Anne, van Lierop, Mathew, Pillay, Neville

    The regulation of aggression in captive animals is an important welfare concern. Captive environments typically provide limited space for animals and many species exhibit heightened aggression in response to spatial restriction. However, primates appear to regulate aggression under these...

  13. Bite marks in mink—Induced experimentally and as reflection of aggressive encounters between mink

    Contributor(s):: Hansen, Steffen W., Møller, Steen H., Damgaard, Birthe M.

    For many years, bite marks have been used as an indicator for aggression in mink production systems. However, the validity of bite marks as indicator of aggression has recently been questioned. We therefore tested the following hypotheses: (1) experimentally applied pressure to, or penetration...

  14. Behavioural patterns established during suckling reappear when piglets are forced to form a new dominance hierarchy

    Contributor(s):: Skok, Janko, Prevolnik, Maja, Urek, Tina, Mesarec, Nikolina, Škorjanc, Dejan

    Early life experiences considerably influence the behavioural development of the animals in which the social environment plays a crucial role. Neonatal piglets experience intense social (including aggressive) interactions when compete with their littermates for the access to teats on the sow's...

  15. Behavioural and physiological responses of domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) to agonistic growls from conspecifics

    Contributor(s):: Wood, Penney A., de Bie, Josine, Clarke, Jennifer A.

    Motivation–structural rule theory predicts that a sender producing harsh, low frequency sounds directed at a conspecific modifies the receiver's behaviour, in part, by communicating its willingness to escalate to an attack. Motivation–structural (MS) rules generally assume that receivers respond...

  16. Two's company? Solitary vixens’ motivations for seeking social contact

    Contributor(s):: Hovland, Anne Lene, Akre, Anne Kathrine, Flø, Andreas, Bakken, Morten, Koistinen, Tarja, Mason, Georgia J.

    The flexible social organisation in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) suggests that social contact could enrich the housing of silver fox vixens (a selected line of red foxes) farmed for their fur. To investigate their social motivation, adult vixens housed in an operant apparatus were allowed to pull a...

  17. Sex ratio, conflict dynamics, and wounding in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    Contributor(s):: Beisner, B. A., Jackson, M. E., Cameron, A., McCowan, B.

    Rhesus macaques, like many other primates, live in stable, multi-male multi-female groups in which adult females typically outnumber adult males. The number of males in multi-male/multi-female groups is most commonly discussed in terms of mate competition, where the sex ratio is a function of an...

  18. Same-sized fish groups increase aggressive interaction of sex-reversed males Nile tilapia GIFT strain

    Contributor(s):: Boscolo, Camila Nomura Pereira, Morais, Rosana Nogueira, Gonçalves-de-Freitas, Eliane

    Animals with similar fighting ability can fight harder and longer than animals in asymmetric contests. Thus, the selection of fish by size similarity in husbandry might increase aggressive interactions, and lead to social instability in socially organized fish. We tested the hypothesis that...

  19. Regurgitation and reingestion in bonobos (Pan paniscus): Relationships between abnormal and social behavior

    Contributor(s):: Miller, Lance J., Tobey, Jennifer R.

    Regurgitation and reingestion (R/R) is an abnormal behavior observed in great apes analogous to rumination syndrome in humans. A majority of the research on R/R in non-human primates has focused on gorillas and chimpanzees with little information relating to other species that also engage in this...

  20. Regrouping rabbit does in a familiar or novel pen: Effects on agonistic behaviour, injuries and core body temperature

    Contributor(s):: Graf, Sylvia, Bigler, Lotti, Failing, Klaus, Würbel, Hanno, Buchwalder, Theres

    Regrouping female rabbits in group-housing systems is common management practice in rabbit breeding, which may, however, induce agonistic interactions resulting in social stress and severe injuries. Here we compared two methods of regrouping female rabbits with respect to their effects on...