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All Categories (101-120 of 120)

  1. A model to quantify the anticipatory response in cats

    Contributor(s):: Tami, G., Martorell, A., Torre, C., Compagnucci, M., Manteca, X.

    The aim of this paper was to develop a protocol to study the anticipatory response in cats as a measure of welfare. Seven experimental cats were trained in a classical conditioning paradigm to associate a sound with food arrival, while sound and food were presented without contingency in four...

  2. Aquaculture and restocking: implications for conservation and welfare. (Special Issue: Conservation and animal welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Braithwaite, V. A., Salvanes, A. G. V.

    As the harvesting of fish through commercial fisheries becomes both harder and less economically viable, the world is becoming increasingly dependent on aquaculture to provide fish for human consumption. The closely related activity of stock enhancement, whereby large numbers of fish are reared...

  3. Are wild animals suited to a travelling circus life?

    Contributor(s):: Iossa, G., Soulsbury, C. D., Harris, S.

    A comprehensive synopsis of the welfare of captive, wild (ie non-domesticated) animals in travelling circuses is missing. We examined circus animal welfare and, specifically, behaviour, health, living and travelling conditions. We compared the conditions of non-domesticated animals in circuses...

  4. Classifying the severity of scientific animal use: a review of international systems

    Contributor(s):: Fenwick, N., Ormandy, E., Gauthier, C., Griffin, G.

    Severity classification systems (ie pain scales, categories of invasiveness, degrees of severity etc) are used to classify the adverse effects experienced by animals used for scientific purposes. Currently, eleven countries use severity classification systems. These systems have developed in...

  5. Conservation and animal welfare issues arising from forestry practices. (Special Issue: Conservation and animal welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Blumstein, D. T.

    Forestry practices may directly kill animals as well as destroy and fragment their habitat. Even without habitat destruction, logging and its associated forest management practices (which include road building, re-forestation, and often increased recreational use) create noise, frighten animals,...

  6. Is sodium fluoroacetate (1080) a humane poison? The influence of mode of action, physiological effects, and target specificity

    Contributor(s):: Twigg, L. E., Parker, R. W.

    1080 (sodium fluoroacetate)-baiting programmes are an important and often the only option for reducing the impact of invasive vertebrate pests on biodiversity and agricultural production in Australia and New Zealand. These programmes are generally recognised as being target specific, and...

  7. Pacing polar bears and stoical sheep: testing ecological and evolutionary hypotheses about animal welfare

    Contributor(s):: Clubb, R., Mason, G.

    Responses to potential threats to welfare vary greatly between species. Even closely related animals often differ in their fear of humans and/or novelty; their behavioural responses to pain; and when captive, their overall welfare and the form and frequency of their stereotypies. Such species...

  8. Structural enrichment and enclosure use in an opportunistic carnivore: the red fox ( Vulpes vulpes )

    Contributor(s):: Kistler, C., Hegglin, D., Wurbel, H., Konig, B.

    An increasing number of zoos keep their animals in natural-looking enclosures, but it is often unclear whether or not the species' behavioural and ecological needs are being adequately met. For species that suffer predation in the wild, structural enrichment in captivity can play a crucial role...

  9. The conservation-welfare nexus in reintroduction programmes: a role for sensory ecology. (Special Issue: Conservation and animal welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Swaisgood, R. R.

    Since reintroduction programmes involve moving animals from captive or wild environments and releasing them into novel environments, there are sure to be a number of challenges to the welfare of the individuals involved. Behavioural theory can help us develop reintroductions that are better for...

  10. Toward a synthesis of conservation and animal welfare science. (Special Issue: Conservation and animal welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Fraser, D.

    Conservation biology and animal welfare science are multidisciplinary fields of research that address social concerns about animals. Conservation biology focuses on wild animals, works at the level of populations, ecological systems and genetic types, and deals with threats to biodiversity and...

  11. Traps for killing stoats ( Mustela erminea ): improving welfare performance

    Contributor(s):: Warburton, B., Poutu, N., Peters, D., Waddington, P.

    Fenn traps are widely used in New Zealand for control of small predators. Introduced stoats (Mustela erminea) pose a significant risk to many indigenous New Zealand bird species, and the Department of Conservation (DOC) has used Fenn traps to reduce their numbers over the last 20-30 years....

  12. Welfare epidemiology as a tool to assess the welfare impact of inherited defects on the pedigree dog population

    Contributor(s):: Collins, L. M., Asher, L., Summers, J. F., Diesel, G., McGreevy, P. D.

    The effect that breed standards and selective breeding practices have on the welfare of pedigree dogs has recently come under scrutiny from both the general public and scientific community. Recent research has suggested that breeding for particular aesthetic traits, such as tightly curled tails,...

  13. Wild animal conservation and welfare in agricultural systems. (Special Issue: Conservation and animal welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Mathews, F.

    At least one-third of the land on earth is used for agricultural production and conflicts with the interests of wildlife are inevitable. These conflicts are likely to escalate as the human population expands and as the scale and intensity of agricultural production increases. This paper argues...

  14. Wildlife conservation and animal welfare: two sides of the same coin? (Special Issue: Conservation and animal welfare.)

    Contributor(s):: Paquet, P. C., Darimont, C. T.

    Human activities deprive wild animals of their life requisites by destroying or impoverishing their surroundings, causing suffering of individuals. Yet, the notion that animal welfare applies to wildlife has escaped many animal welfarists and conservationists. A well-accepted and applied ethical...

  15. Countering brutality to wildlife, relationism and ethics: conservation, welfare and the 'ecoversity'. (Special issue: Minding animals: Emerging issues concerning our relationships with other animals.)

    Contributor(s):: Garlick, S., Matthews, J., Carter, J.

    Wildlife objectification and cruelty are everyday aspects of Australian society that eschew values of human kindness, empathy, and an understanding of the uniqueness and importance of non-human life in the natural world. Fostered by institutional failure, greed and selfishness, and the worst...

  16. En guise de conclusions

    Contributor(s):: Denis, B.

  17. Man and wolf in Poland : a delicate balance

    Contributor(s):: Okarma, Henryk

  18. Modern wildlife management : example of four species in the province of Alessandria (Italy)

    Contributor(s):: Silvano, F., Acquarone, C., Cucco, M., Malacarne, G.

  19. Some aspects of the influence of habitat changes on wildlife in Poland

    Contributor(s):: Fruzinski, B.

  20. Some effects of hunting on wild mammalian populations

    Contributor(s):: Sforzi, A., Lovari, S.