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  1. "Resting" behaviour of cattle in a slaughterhouse lairage

    Contributor(s):: Cockram, M. S.

  2. 'The One Dog Who Saved Thousands of Lives': Erika Abrams at TEDxIIMUdaipur

    Contributor(s):: Erika Abrams

    Opening a veterinary hospital, shelter, and sanctuary for abused, injured,and neglected animals wasn't a lifelong dream, but Animal Aid Unlimited has become Erika's life pursuit and passion.

  3. Sep 28 2015

    2015 Animal Ethics Seminar

    A seminar for members of Animal Ethics Committees and their Executive Officers, and animal researchers, is to be held at the Australian Catholic University, North Sydney, on 29 September 2015. The...

    https://habricentral.org/events/details/353

  4. A 'pebble test of anxiety' did not differentiate between Japanese quail divergently selected for stress and fear

    Contributor(s):: Jones, R. B., Marin, R. H., Satterlee, D. G.

    It has been suggested that the time taken by an individually tested domestic chick to begin pecking at pebbles on the floor of a novel arena might be used as a test of fear and anxiety, with low latencies to peck indicating low fear and vice versa, and as a potential selection criterion 'to...

  5. A behavioural comparison of New Zealand White rabbits ( Oryctolagus cuniculus ) housed individually or in pairs in conventional laboratory cages

    Contributor(s):: Chu, L. R., Garner, J. P., Mench, J. A.

    Despite their gregarious nature, rabbits used for research are often housed individually due to concerns about aggression and disease transmission. However, conventional laboratory cages restrict movement, and rabbits housed singly in these cages often perform abnormal behaviours, an indication...

  6. A behavioural study of growing pigs in different environments

    Contributor(s):: Ruiterkamp, W. A.

    The full-slat system, the half-slat system (both without substrate) and the Danish system consisting of a lying area supplied with straw and a separated dunging area were compared. Two types of pigs were used; those born and reared in a bare slat pen without any substrate and those in a pen with...

  7. A brief report on effects of transfer from outdoor grazing to indoor tethering and back on urinary cortisol and behaviour in dairy cattle

    Contributor(s):: Higashiyama, Y., Nashiki, M., Narita, H., Kawasaki, M.

    The present study was performed to investigate the effects of transferring cattle (n=7) from pasture to indoor confinement and their return to pasture on their physiological and behavioural responses. On the day after the cows were moved to indoor tethering, urinary cortisol increased...

  8. A cage without a view increases stress and impairs cognitive performance in rats

    Contributor(s):: Harris, A. P., D'Eath, R. B., Healy, S. D.

    Single housing is believed to be chronically stressful and to have a negative impact on welfare and cognition in rats (Rattus norvegicus). However, single housing does not consistently evoke stress-like responses nor does it consistently impair cognitive performance. In an experiment in which all...

  9. A case for dawn and dusk for housed livestock

    Contributor(s):: Bryant, S. L.

  10. A Case Study of Behaviour and Performance of Confined or Pastured Cows During the Dry Period

    Contributor(s):: Randi A. Black, Peter D. Krawczel

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of the dry cow management system (pasture or confined) on: (1) lying behaviour and activity; (2) feeding and heat stress behaviours; (3) intramammary infections, postpartum. Non-lactating Holstein cows were assigned to either deep-bedded,...

  11. A comparative study of the influence of social housing conditions on the behaviour of captive tigers ( Panthera tigris )

    Contributor(s):: Rouck, M. de, Kitchener, A. C., Law, G., Nelissen, M.

    Nowadays, zoos are increasingly concerned with animal welfare as public expectations and knowledge of the needs of captive animals increases. Although many zoos try to provide all sorts of enrichment for their big cats, the importance of social enrichment is not yet fully understood. This study...

  12. A comparison between leg problems in Danish and Swedish broiler production

    Contributor(s):: Sanotra, G. S., Berg, C., Lund, J. D.

    In Denmark and Sweden, surveys were undertaken to estimate the prevalence of leg problems in conventional broiler production. The Danish survey included 28 Ross 208 flocks, and the Swedish survey included 15 Ross 208 and 16 Cobb flocks. Leg problems included reduced walking ability (gait), tibial...

  13. A comparison of attachment levels of adopters of cats: fee-based adoptions versus free adoptions

    Contributor(s):: Weiss, E., Gramann, S.

    Nonhuman animal welfare professionals have been critical of adoption programs that do not charge a fee for adult cats, despite the high euthanasia rate for cats due to a reported lack of homes. The argument against the free cat adoptions cites a devaluation of the cat, which may affect the...

  14. A Comparison of Cats (Felis silvestris catus) Housed in Groups and Single Cages at a Shelter: A Retrospective Matched Cohort Study

    Contributor(s):: Malini Suchak, Jacalyn Lamica

    When cats are relinquished to shelters, they frequently experience a great deal of stress. Shelters often try to control certain aspects of their environment, such as housing, to help them relax. Some cats are placed in small group rooms upon entry, whereas others are placed in single cages....

  15. A comparison of cell-mediated immune responses in rhesus macaques housed singly, in pairs, or in groups

    Contributor(s):: Schapiro, S. J., Nehete, P. N., Perlman, J. E., Sastry, K. J.

    A variety of psychosocial factors have been shown to influence immunological responses in laboratory primates. The present investigation examined the effects of social housing condition on cell-mediated immune responses, comparing rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in three housing conditions...

  16. A comparison of social and environmental enrichment methods for laboratory housed dogs

    Contributor(s):: Hubrecht, R. C.

    48 Beagles in 4 equal groups: (controls; opportunities for social contacts with conspecifics; given 30 s/day of intensive handling; and provided with 3 different toys/chews permanently suspended in the pen (Rawhide, Gumabone chew and a piece of plastic tubing)) were observed for a total of 432 h....

  17. A comparison of space requirements of horned and hornless goats at the feed barrier and in the lying area

    Contributor(s):: Loretz, C., Wechsler, B., Hauser, R., Rusch, P.

    Loose housing of horned goats is more common than loose housing of horned cattle, and recommendations concerning the design of housing systems for horned goats are needed. In this study, we compared the behaviour of horned and hornless goats kept in deep litter pens to investigate their space...

  18. A comparison of tethering and pen confinement of dogs

    Contributor(s):: Yeon, S. C., Golden, G., Sung, W., Erb, H. N., Reynolds, A. J., Houpt, K. A.

    This study compared the general activity and specific behaviours of 30 adult Alaskan sled dogs (19 males and 11 females) on 3.5-m tethers and in 5.9-m2 pens. The investigators used activity level and stereotypical behaviour as indicators of welfare. The dogs spent most of their time inactive,...

  19. A comparison of the activity budgets of wild and captive Sulawesi crested black macaques ( Macaca nigra )

    Contributor(s):: Melfi, V. A., Feistner, A. T. C.

    One aim of environmental enrichment techniques is to replicate 'wild-like' behaviour in captivity. In this study, three captive troops of Sulawesi crested black macaques (M. nigra) in Chester, Jersey and Marwell Zoos, UK were each observed for 100 h in large naturalistic enclosures In May and...

  20. A comparison of the effects of simple versus complex environmental enrichment on the behaviour of group-housed, subadult rhesus macaques

    Contributor(s):: Schapiro, S. J., Bloomsmith, M. A., Suarez, S. A., Porter, L. M.