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  1. The Social Contract, the Conservative Attitude, and Antibiotics Development

    Contributor(s):: Weber, Eli

  2. The effect of isoflurane anaesthesia and buprenorphine on the mouse grimace scale and behaviour in CBA and DBA/2 mice

    Contributor(s):: Miller, A., Kitson, G., Skalkoyannis, B., Leach, M.

    Prevention or alleviation of pain in laboratory mice is a fundamental requirement of in vivo research. The mouse grimace scale (MGS) has the potential to be an effective and rapid means of assessing pain and analgesic efficacy in laboratory mice. Preliminary studies have demonstrated its...

  3. Evaluation of a novel rodenticide: acute sub-lethal effects of a methaemoglobin-inducing agent

    Contributor(s):: Quy, R. J., Gibson, T. J., Lambert, M. S., Eason, C. T., Gregory, N. G.

    In a series of experiments the welfare of para-aminovalerophenone (PAVP) sub-lethally poisoned rats ( Rattus norvegicus) was assessed. The experiments: (i) examined the acute methaemoglobin (MetHb) profile over time; (ii) refined the LD50 estimate for PAVP in adult female rats; (iii) developed...

  4. Evaluation of a novel rodenticide: welfare assessment of fatal methaemoglobinaemia in adult rats ( Rattus norvegicus)

    Contributor(s):: Gibson, T. J., Quy, R. J., Eason, C. T., Gregory, N. G.

    This study assessed the welfare of rats ( Rattus norvegicus) poisoned with a lethal dose of the methaemoglobin (MetHb) inducing compound para-aminovalerophenone (PAVP). Twenty rats were orally gavaged with either PAVP (treated) or the vehicle only (control). Spontaneous and evoked behaviours were...

  5. Stereotypic mice are aggressed by their cage-mates, and tend to be poor demonstrators in social learning tasks

    Contributor(s):: Harper, L., Choleris, E., Ervin, K., Fureix, C., Reynolds, K., Walker, M., Mason, G.

    Stereotypic behaviours (SBs) are linked with behavioural inflexibility and resemble symptoms of autism, suggesting that stereotypic animals could have autistic-like social impairments. SBs are also common in caged mice. We therefore hypothesised relationships between stereotypic and social...

  6. Urinary posture and motor laterality in dogs ( Canis lupus familiaris) at two shelters

    Contributor(s):: Gough, W., McGuire, B.

    Motor laterality is the preference shown for using one limb or lateral half of the body over the other. In domestic dogs, most laterality studies have examined forelimb preferences during staged tasks. We focused instead on hindlimb preferences during urination when males use the raised-leg...

  7. Exploring the canine mind: Studies of dog cognition

    Contributor(s):: Macpherson, Krista, Roberts, William A.

  8. Refinement of welfare through development of a quantitative system for assessment of lifetime experience

    Contributor(s):: Wolfensohn, S., Sharpe, S., Hall, I., Lawrence, S., Kitchen, S., Dennis, M.

    This paper proposes a system that uses intrinsic study data to provide a clear visualisation of the stresses involved during the animal's life history that can be applied to all types of studies, even those not requiring invasive techniques. Thus, it provides an opportunity for researchers to...

  9. Playful handling of laboratory rats is more beneficial when applied before than after routine injections

    Contributor(s):: Cloutier, S., Wahl, K. L., Panksepp, J., Newberry, R. C.

    The ability of positive affective states to counteract negative states engendered by routine medical procedures remains poorly studied. In laboratory rats, positive affect typically associated with rough-and-tumble play can be induced through human "hand play" - the experience of being "tickled"...

  10. The power of automated behavioural homecage technologies in characterizing disease progression in laboratory mice: a review

    Contributor(s):: Richardson, C. A.

    Behavioural changes that occur as animals become sick have been characterized in a number of species and include the less frequent occurrence of 'luxury behaviours' such as playing, grooming and socialization. 'Sickness behaviours' or behavioural changes following exposure to infectious agents,...

  11. Clinical animal behaviour models of stereotypic behaviour and underlying cognition

    Contributor(s):: Daniel Mills

    Bizarre repetitive behaviour may be quite common, with estimates in people and dogs of a prevalence of up to 8%. Whereas these are often considered important indicators of mental health problems in people, in companion animals, many owners view these behaviours as "quirky" or even...

  12. Evaluation of microwave energy as a humane stunning technique based on electroencephalography (EEG) of anaesthetised cattle

    Contributor(s):: Rault, J. L., Hemsworth, P. H., Cakebread, P. L., Mellor, D. J., Johnson, C. B.

    Humane slaughter implies that an animal experiences minimal pain and distress before it is killed. Stunning is commonly used to induce insensibility but can lead to variable results or be considered unsatisfactory by some religious groups. Microwave energy can induce insensibility in rats, and...

  13. Is Counseling Going to the Dogs? An Exploratory Study Related to the Inclusion of an Animal in Group Counseling with Adolescents

    Contributor(s):: Lange, Amber M., Cox, Jane A., Bernert, Donna J., Jenkins, Christie D.

  14. Distribution of nonhuman animal versus nonanimal research funding at four U.S. Institutions in fiscal year 2000

    Contributor(s):: Bogle, R., Greek, R.

    Much controversy exists concerning the use of nonhuman animals in biomedical research. Textbooks, articles, and journals are dedicated to studying animal models, studying alternatives, and debating various aspects of the issue. Surprisingly however, very little information exists on how many...

  15. Responsible Animal-Based Research: Three Flags to Consider

    Contributor(s):: Dagg, Anne Innis

    Comments on the use of flagging experiments in reducing the amount of animal-based research. Lack of recognition towards the influence of flagging experiments on animal-based researches; Consideration for the large numbers of animals used in experiments; Invasive procedures used in animal...

  16. The effects of environmental control on cognition in rats ( Rattus norvegicus )

    Contributor(s):: Alliger, A. A., Moller, P.

    The aim of this study was to allow nonhuman animals to control their environment using operant conditioning procedures and to assess the effect of control on cognitive tasks. The study tested 4 predictions: (a) rats (Rattus norvegicus) will control a light stimulus; (b) animals will exhibit...

  17. There's a rat in my room! Now what? Mice show no chronic physiological response to the presence of rats

    Contributor(s):: Meijer, M. K., Loo, P. L. P. van, Baumans, V.

    In general, guidelines on housing and care of animals in the laboratory state that rats and mice should not be housed in the same room. Mice may perceive rats as predators. Although one theory says this can cause stress, there is little scientific evidence to support this theory. In the wild,...

  18. For Science, Love and Money: The Social Worlds of Poultry and Rabbit Breeding in Britain, 1900-1940

    Contributor(s):: Marie, Jenny

  19. Owners as a secure base for their dogs

    Contributor(s):: Mariti, Chiara, Ricci, Eva, Zilocchi, Marcella, Gazzano, Angelo

  20. Clinical feasibility of cognitive testing in dogs ( Canis lupus familiaris)

    Contributor(s):: Heckler, M. C. T., Tranquilim, M. V., Svicero, D. J., Barbosa, L., Amorim, R. M.

    Several cognitive tests have been developed to evaluate specific aspects of human and animal learning and memory. These tests have been used for early detection of cognitive deficits and to monitor the treatment of dogs with cognitive impairment. Thus, this article evaluated the feasibility of...