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  1. Awareness of rabies and response to dog bites in a Bangladesh community

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sumon Ghosh, Sukanta Chowdhury, Najmul Haider, Rajub K. Bhowmik, Md. S. Rana, Aung S. Prue Marma, Muhammad B. Hossain, Nitish C. Debnath, Be-Nazir Ahmed

    Community awareness regarding rabies and treatment seeking behaviours are critical both for the prevention and control of the disease in human and animals. We conducted a study to explore people’s awareness about rabies, their attitudes towards dogs and practices associated with treating...

  2. Human-wildlife conflict-causes, consequences and mitigation measures with special reference to Kashmir

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Aadil Habib, Ishfaq Nazir, Mustahson F. Fazili, Bilal A. Bhat

    The rising levels of man-animal conflicts at various locations of Kashmir valley in India are due to close proximity between humans and wild carnivores particularly leopard and black bear. The data regarding human injuries and mortalities caused during conflicts from 2010 to 2012 was collected...

  3. You Are Not My Handler! Impact of Changing Handlers on Dogs' Behaviours and Detection Performance

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: La Toya J. Jamieson, Greg S. Baxter, Peter J. Murray

    Dog-handler relationships can directly impact team success. Changing a dog’s handler may therefore compromise detection performance. However, there are currently few studies which support this. This research explored the performance and behavioural impact of changing a dog’s...

  4. Empathy in dogs: With a little help from a friend – a mixed blessing

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sabrina Karl, Ludwig Huber

    Kujala (2017) presents an extensive overview of existing research on canine emotions in comparison to those of other non-human animals and humans. This commentary provides some additional research results on the intensively debated field of empathy in dogs. We focus on recent advances in...

  5. Letter to the Editor Re: Kipperman, B.S. and German, A.J. Animals 2018, 8, 143

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Katharine M. Watson

    A recent opinion paper by Kipperman and German (2018) discussed the increasing prevalence of pet obesity, the risk factors contributing to this increase, and the role of veterinarians in helping manage pet obesity. They described the problem as a One Health problem as it has been previously...

  6. Hunting as a Management Tool? Cougar-Human Conflict is Positively Related to Trophy Hunting

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kristine J. Teichman, Bogdan Cristescu, Chris T. Darimont

    Background: Overexploitation and persecution of large carnivores resulting from conflict with humans comprise major causes of declines worldwide. Although little is known about the interplay between these mortality types, hunting of predators remains a common management strategy aimed at...

  7. Bibliographic Essay: The History of Human-Animal Relations

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: J. Wendel Cox

    Animals are everywhere. Whether as pets, pests, sources of food, fuel, or materials for manufacture, means of traction or source of motive power, or objects of veneration and fear and wonder, animals have been our counterparts throughout human history. In recent years, a historical literature...

  8. What Makes a Rabbit Cute? Preference for Rabbit Faces Differs according to Skull Morphology and Demographic Factors

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Naomi D. Harvey, James A. Oxley, Giuliana Miguel-Pacheco, Emma M. Gosling, Mark Farnworth

    Domesticated rabbits typically exhibit shorter, flatter skulls than their wild counterparts (brachycephalism). However, brachycephaly is associated with considerable health problems, including problems with dentition. The aim of this study was to establish which type of rabbit face people...

  9. Emotions and Ethical Decision-Making in Animal Ethics Committees

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Elisabeth Tjärnström, Elin M. Weber, Jan Hultgren, Helena Röcklinsberg

    Ethical evaluation of projects involving animal testing is mandatory within the EU and other countries. However, the evaluation process has been subject to criticism, e.g., that the committees are not balanced or democratic enough and that the utilitarian weighting of harm and benefit that is...

  10. The Responsibility of Veterinarians to Address Companion Animal Obesity

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Barry S. Kipperman, Alexander J. German

    Obesity is a modern-day epidemic in both people and companion animals. A summary of the current research on the causes, risk factors, consequences, and implications of overweight and obesity, and the compliance of small-animal practitioners in recognizing and addressing pet obesity, is...

  11. Underreporting of wildlife-vehicle collisions does not hinder predictive models for large ungulates

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Nathan P. Snow, William F. Porter, David M. Williams

    Conflicts from wildlife–vehicle collisions (WVCs) pose serious challenges for managing and conserving large ungulates throughout the world. However, underreporting of large proportions of WVCs (i.e., two-thirds of WVCs in some cases) creates concern for relying on governmental databases...

  12. Thermography as a Non-Invasive Measure of Stress and Fear of Humans in Sheep

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Simona Cannas, Clara Palestrini, Elisabetta Canali, Bruno Cozzi, Nicola Ferri, Eugenio Heinzl, Michela Minero, Matteo Chincarini, Giorgio Vignola, Emanuela Dalla Costa

    No data have been published on the use of infrared thermography (IRT) to evaluate sheep emotions. We assessed whether this technique can be used as a non-invasive measure of negative emotions. Two voluntary animal approach (VAA) tests were conducted (and filmed) on five ewes before and after...

  13. Public geospatial datasets as an approach to maximizing efficiency in the collection of site covariates in wildlife–vehicle collision studies

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: James A. Vance, Walter H. Smith, Gabrielle L. Smith

    Wildlife–vehicle collisions (WVCs) are a major research focus because of increasing human health and safety concerns and the potential for biological impacts on wildlife. A key component of both understanding the causes of WVCs and designing mitigation measures is the collection and...

  14. Environmental factors influencing the occurrence of coyotes and conflicts in urban areas

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sharon A. Poessel, Eric M. Gese, Julie K. Young

    The increase of global urbanization can have effects on wildlife species, including carnivores such as coyotes (Canis latrans). As coyotes continue to settle in more urban areas, reports of human-coyote conflicts, such as attacks on humans or pets, may also increase. Understanding environmental...

  15. Behavioral and Perceptual Differences between Sexes in Dogs: An Overview

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Anna Scandurra, Alessandra Alterisio, Anna Di Cosmo, Biagio D’Aniello

    In this paper, we review the scientific reports of sex-related differences in dogs as compared to the outcomes described for wild animals. Our aim was to explore whether the differences in male and female dogs were affected by the domestication process, in which artificial selection is the main...

  16. The impact of poverty on dog ownership and access to canine rabies vaccination: results from a knowledge, attitudes and practices survey, Uganda 2013

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Ryan MacLaren Wallace, Jason Mehal, Yoshinori Nakazawa, Sergio Recuenco, Barnabas Bakamutumaho, Modupe Osinubi, Victor Tugumizemu, Jesse D. Blanton, Amy Gilbert, Joseph Wamala

    Background: Rabies is a neglected disease despite being responsible for more human deaths than any other zoonosis. A lack of adequate human and dog surveillance, resulting in low prioritization, is often blamed for this paradox. Estimation methods are often employed to describe the rabies...

  17. The Effect of Training on Stride Duration in a Cohort of Two-Year-Old and Three-Year-Old Thoroughbred Racehorses

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Rebecca S. V. Parkes, Renate Weller, Thilo Pfau, Thomas H. Witte

    Objective gait monitoring is increasingly accessible to trainers. A more comprehensive understanding of ‘normal’ gait adaptations is required. Forty two-year-old thoroughbred racehorses were recruited when entering training and followed for 22 months. Gait analysis was performed by...

  18. Exploring Social Desirability Bias in Perceptions of Dog Adoption: All's Well that Ends Well? Or Does the Method of Adoption Matter?

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Courtney Bir, Nicole Olynk Widmar, Candace Croney

    Dogs are a popular companion animal in the United States; however, dog acquisition is often a contentious subject. Adoption is often cited as an ethical and popular method of acquisition but interpretation of the term ‘adoption’ may vary. In a nationally representative survey of the...

  19. A benefit-cost analysis decision framework for mitigation of disease transmission at the wildlife–livestock interface

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Stephanie A Shwiff, Steven J Sweeney, Julie L Elser, Ryan S Miller, Matthew L Farnsworth, Pauline Nol, Steven S Shwiff, Aaron M Anderson

    The economics of managing disease transmission at the wildlife–livestock interface have received heightened attention as agricultural and natural resource agencies struggle to tackle growing risks to animal health. In the fiscal landscape of increased scrutiny and shrinking budgets,...

  20. Human development and climate affect hibernation in a large carnivore with implications for human–carnivore conflicts

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Heather E. Johnson, David L. Lewis, Tana L. Verzuh, Cody F. Wallace, Rebecca M. Much, Lyle K. Willmarth, Stewart W. Breck

    1. Expanding human development and climate change are dramatically altering habitat conditions for wildlife. While the initial response of wildlife to changing environmental conditions is typically a shift in behavior, little is known about the effects of these stressors on hibernation...