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  1. Welfare Impacts of Spay/Neuter-Focused Outreach on Companion Animals in New York City Public Housing

    Contributor(s):: Dolan, Emily D., Weiss, Emily, Slater, Margaret R.

    Spay/neuter (S/N) programs aim to reduce shelter intake and euthanasia. However, there is little published evidence of a causal effect between S/N programs and shelter intake or euthanasia. To uncover any ancillary effects of S/N, this study examined the impact of S/N door-to-door outreach on...

  2. Impact of mandatory microchipping on traceability of sheltered dogs in the Czech Republic

    Contributor(s):: Zak, Jiri, Voslarova, Eva, Vecerek, Vladimir, Bedanova, Iveta

    Records of 4,455 sheltered dogs were analyzed to compare the numbers of traceable (able to be reunited with original caregivers) and untraceable (unable to be reunited with original caregivers) dogs before (Period 1) and after (Period 2) introduction of a mandatory microchipping. Records were...

  3. Factors Influencing Time to Adoption for Dogs in a Provincial Shelter System in Canada

    Contributor(s):: Kay, Aileigh, Coe, Jason B., Young, Ian, Pearl, David

    Millions of companion animals are relinquished to shelters each year. For each dog entering, their characteristics and the characteristics of the shelter holding him/her influence their time to adoption. Using a Cox proportional hazards frailty model, these issues were explored using data from 31...

  4. Evaluation of a Community’s Risk for Canine Parvovirus and Distemper Using Antibody Testing and GIS Mapping of Animal Shelter Intakes

    Contributor(s):: Spindel, Miranda E., Krecic, Matthew R., Slater, Margaret R., Vigil, Nicole

    This cross-sectional study aimed to identify where dogs with negative antibody tests to canine parvovirus (CPV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) originated when entering a community shelter, using a commercially available ELISA antibody test and Geographic Information Systems mapping. Of 2745...

  5. Effect of Visitor Perspective on Adoption Decisions at One Animal Shelter

    Contributor(s):: Southland, Anastacia, Dowling-Guyer, Seana, McCobb, Emily

    This study investigated the visitor experience at one urban animal shelter. While several previous studies have examined the reasons particular nonhuman animals are chosen by adopters, few have investigated the possible reasons one would visit a shelter and leave without adopting. Over a...

  6. Cross-Sectional Study of Characteristics of Owners and Nonowners Surrendering Cats to Four Australian Animal Shelters

    Contributor(s):: Zito, Sarah, Morton, John, Paterson, Mandy, Vankan, Dianne, Bennett, Pauleen C., Rand, Jacquie, Phillips, Clive J. C.

    Unwanted cats surrendered to nonhuman animal shelters are generally categorized as either “owned” or “stray.” This classification is misleading because “stray” cats may include many “semiowned” cats, for which people provide care but who are not perceived as being owned. This differentiation is...

  7. Occupational Health of Animal Shelter Employees by Live Release Rate, Shelter Type, and Euthanasia-Related Decision

    Contributor(s):: Andrukonis, Allison, Protopopova, Alexandra

    Approximately a quarter of dogs and cats in animal shelters in the United States are euthanized. The stress associated with having to care for animals they subsequently euthanize puts animal shelter workers at a high risk for compassion fatigue, burnout, and even suicide. The aim of the present...

  8. Opinions of UK Rescue Shelter and Rehoming Center Workers on the Problems Facing Their Industry

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Stavisky, Jenny, Brennan, Marnie L., Downes, Martin J., Dean, Rachel S.

    Animal shelters exist worldwide to care for and rehome unwanted or straying pets. Previous studies have examined why owners breed unwanted animals, or relinquish their pets to shelters. However, the views of shelter workers, who receive and care for these animals, have previously been largely...

  9. Using hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal measures for assessing and reducing the stress of dogs in shelters: A review

    | Contributor(s):: Hennessy, Michael B.

    Dogs admitted to animal shelters exhibit behavioral and physiological signs of stress. Among these is activation of the body's primary stress-responsive system, the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis. HPA activity provides a metric for assessing both the dog's physiological response to the...

  10. Effects of human contact and toys on the fear responses to humans of shelter-housed dogs

    | Contributor(s):: Conley, Melanie J., Fisher, Andrew D., Hemsworth, Paul H.

    This study examined the effects of human contact and toys on fear responses to humans in small breed, shelter-housed dogs. Ninety dogs were assigned to one of three treatments: “control” (control), comprising routine husbandry performed by shelter staff; “human contact” (HC), where dogs...

  11. Approach behaviour of shelter dogs and its relationships with the attitudes of shelter staff to dogs

    | Contributor(s):: Arhant, Christine, Troxler, Josef

    The behaviour of animals towards humans is widely used to assess human–animal relationship and welfare in livestock. The aim of this study was to develop an approach test for dogs that is feasible in a surveillance setting, shows stability over a given time period and has good...

  12. The Road to TNR: Examining Trap-Neuter-Return Through the Lens of Our Evolving Ethics

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Peter Joseph Wolf, Joan E. Schaffner

    In the 2008 article “A Review of Feral Cat Control,” Robertson explored the trend developing in the management of so-called “feral” cats away from lethal methods toward the non-lethal method of trap-neuter-return (TNR). The review explored various issues raised by the...

  13. Sex of Walker Influences Scent-marking Behavior of Shelter Dogs

    | Contributor(s):: McGuire, B., Fry, K., Orantes, D., Underkofler, L., Parry, S.

    Interactions with humans influence the behavior and physiology of other animals, and the response can vary with sex and familiarity. Dogs in animal shelters face challenging conditions and although contact with humans typically reduces stress and behaviors associated with stress, evidence...

  14. Evaluating the effects of a temporary fostering program on shelter dog welfare

    | Contributor(s):: Gunter, L. M., Feuerbacher, E. N., Gilchrist, R. J., Wynne, C. D. L.

  15. Is there a relationship between attitudes of shelter staff to cats and the cats’ approach behaviour?

    | Contributor(s):: Arhant, Christine, Troxler, Josef

    One aspect of welfare that is measured in protocols used for the assessment of farm animal welfare is the human-animal relationship. The aim of the present study was to develop a ‘human approach test’ to measure the human-animal relationship in shelter cats and to investigate aspects of...

  16. Factors determining the effects of human interaction on the cortisol levels of shelter dogs

    | Contributor(s):: Willen, Regina M., Mutwill, Alexandra, MacDonald, Lauren J., Schiml, Patricia A., Hennessy, Michael B.

    The stress experienced by dogs admitted to animal shelters not only impacts welfare, but may lead to behavior that threatens successful adoptions. This stress is reflected in an elevation in the plasma cortisol levels of newly admitted dogs. We previously found 30min of human interaction reduced...

  17. Follow-up surveys of people who have adopted dogs and cats from an Australian shelter

    | Contributor(s):: Scott, Sophie, Jong, Evelien, McArthur, Michelle, Hazel, Susan J.

    Unwanted pets are a major concern in Australia and many other countries, with shelters under pressure to accommodate them. This study assessed the degree of satisfaction among individuals whom had adopted a cat or a dog from the Animal Welfare League South Australia (AWL). The survey also...

  18. An Evaluation of Respondent Conditioning Procedures to Decrease Barking in an Animal Shelter

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Steven Wade Payne, Kian S Assemi

    A common problem behavior in animal shelters is excessive noise from barking, which can regularly exceed 100dBs.  Noise levels in animal shelters are correlated with increased stress in dogs, which may lead to increased problem behavior and a decrease in adoption.  The purpose of the...

  19. Preliminary analysis of post-adoption outcomes for kittens and adult cats rehomed through a New Zealand animal shelter

    | Contributor(s):: Gates, M. C., Mancera, K., Dale, A., Zito, S.

  20. Avoidance Distance in Sheltered Cows and Its Association with Other Welfare Parameters

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sharma, A., Phillips, C. J. C.