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  1. From In-Person to Virtual: A Case Study of an Animal-Assisted Visiting Program in a Pediatric Setting

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Whitney Romine

    This article focuses on the practical aspects of converting a successful in-person AAA program to a virtual program in a health care setting including human, canine, and physical resources; animal welfare considerations; training, infection control, and safety guidelines; and visit delivery...

  2. Effects of dogs' visits to a public exhibition

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Vanda Marnoto, Gonçalo G. Pereira, Sara Fragoso, Ana Faria, Sandra Soares, Florbela Elias, Rita Santos, Márcia Silva, Sónia Saraiva, Ana Santos, Leonor Galhardo

      Outdoor activities with dogs are known to be physically and mentally beneficial to them and their owners, but less is known about their circulation in public spaces. This study aimed to understand the effects of dog-owner dyad’s visits to an interactive exhibition on the...

  3. Defining Terms Used for Animals Working in Support Roles for People with Support Needs

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Howell, T. J., Nieforth, L., Thomas-Pino, C., Samet, L., Agbonika, S., Cuevas-Pavincich, F., Fry, N. E., Hill, K., Jegatheesan, B., Kakinuma, M., MacNamara, M., Mattila-Rautiainen, S., Perry, A., Tardif-Williams, C. Y., Walsh, E. A., Winkle, M., Yamamoto, M., Yerbury, R., Rawat, V., Alm, K., Avci, A., Bailey, T., Baker, H., Benton, P., Binney, C., Boyle, S., Brandes, H., Carr, A. M., Coombe, W., Coulter, K., Darby, A., Davies, L., Delisle, E., Enders-Slegers, M. J., Fournier, A., Fox, M., Gee, N., Graham, T. M., Hamilton-Bruce, A., Hansen, T. G. B., Hart, L., Heirs, M., Hooper, J., Howe, R., Johnson, E., Jones, M., Karagiannis, C., Kieson, E., Kim, S. A., Kivlen, C., Lanning, B., Lewis, H., Linder, D., Mai, D. L., Mariti, C., Mead, R., Ferreira, G. M., Ngai, D., O'Keeffe, S., O'Connor, G., Olsen, C., Ormerod, E., Power, E. R., Pritchard, P. A., Rodriguez, K., Rook, D., Ruby, M. B., Schofield, L., Signal, T., Steel, J., Stone, W., Symonds, M., Rooy, D. V., Warda, T., Wilson, M., Young, J., Bennett, P.

    The nomenclature used to describe animals working in roles supporting people can be confusing. The same term may be used to describe different roles, or two terms may mean the same thing. This confusion is evident among researchers, practitioners, and end users. Because certain animal roles are...

  4. Reactivation of a Hospital-Based Therapy Dog Visitation Program during the COVID-19 Pandemic

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Townsend, Lisa, Heatwole, Jennifer K., Gee, Nancy R.

    This study examined human–animal interactions during the reactivation of a hospital-based therapy dog program during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected from human–dog interactions at an academic medical center in Virginia. Interaction length, participant role, age group...

  5. Fostering a More Humane University Environment Through Course Work, Service-Learning, and Animal-Assisted Interventions and Activities

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Aubrey H. Fine, Philip Tedeschi, Teal Mackintosh, Jane Boone

    Incorporating coursework on animal-assisted interventions and human animal interactions has become a viable option for students in higher education. These educational opportunities appear to enhance the quality of education the students receive as well as improve the experience of students...

  6. Experimental trial demonstrates effects of animal-assisted stress prevention program on college students' positive and negative emotion

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Patricia Pendry, Alexa M. Carr, Stephanie M. Roeter, Jaymie L. Vandagriff

    In response to the growing prevalence of mental health issues among college students, campuses across the nation are implementing animal-assisted stress reduction programs, despite a clear lack of evidence supporting their efficacy. Researchers conducted a randomized controlled trial to...

  7. Animal Visitation Program (AVP) Reduces Cortisol Levels of University Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Patricia Pendry, Jaymie L. Vandagriff

    University students report high levels of stress. Although causal work is limited, one popular approach to promote stress relief is animal visitation programs (AVPs). We conducted a randomized trial (N = 249) examining effects of a 10-minute AVP on students’ salivary cortisol levels....

  8. Characteristics of Student– Dog Interaction during a Meet-and-Greet Activity in a University-Based Animal Visitation Program

    | Contributor(s):: Pendry, Patricia, Kuzara, Stephanie, Gee, Nancy R.

    The use of university-based Animal Visitation Programs (AVPs)—programs aimed at reducing student stress through human–animal interaction (HAI)—has increased. Implementation has expanded despite our limited understanding about program effects on student and animal wellbeing. Moreover, little is...

  9. Employee Attitudes about the Impact of Visitation Dogs on a College Campus

    | Contributor(s):: Foreman, Anne M., Allison, Penelope, Poland, Michelle, Meade, B. Jean, Wirth, Oliver

    Therapy and visitation dogs are becoming more common on college campuses to provide comfort and support to students, but little attention has been given to the concerns of faculty and staff who share space with the dogs in their workplaces. The purpose of this study was to assess the perceptions...

  10. The communicative role of companion pets in patient-centered critical care

    | Contributor(s):: Yamasaki, J.

  11. Exploring the Handler-Dog Connection within a University-Based Animal-Assisted Activity

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Kuzara, S., Pendry, P., Gee, N. R.

  12. Therapeutic effects of dog visits in nursing homes for the elderly

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Thodberg, Karen, Sørensen, Lisbeth Uhrskov, Christensen, Janne Winther, Poulsen, Pia Haun, Houbak, Birthe, Damgaard, Vibeke, Keseler, Ingrid, Edwards, David, Videbech, Poul B.

    BackgroundPrevious studies have suggested that visiting dogs can have positive effects on elderly people in nursing homes. We wanted to study the effects of biweekly dog visits on sleep patterns and the psychiatric well‐being of elderly people.MethodsA total of 100 residents (median age: 85.5...

  13. Prevalence of zoonotic agents in dogs visiting hospitalized people in Ontario: implications for infection control

    | Contributor(s):: Lefebvre, S. L., Waltner-Toews, D., Peregrine, A. S., Reid-Smith, R., Hodge, L., Arroyo, L. G., Weese, J. S.

  14. Terapia mediada por animais e saúde mental: um programa no Centro de Atenção Psicossocial da Infância e Adolescência em Porto Alegre - TAA Parte III

    | Contributor(s):: C.B. Franco, A. Pizzinato, M.C. Moreira, M.L.S. Zavaschi, T. Santos, V.L.S. de Oliveira, F.L. Boschetti, L. De M. Menti

    Portuguese:O objetivo deste estudo foi examinar as repercussões de um programa de terapia mediada por animais junto a um grupo de pacientes do Centro de Atenção Psicossocial da Infância e Adolescência do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre-RS. Teve como objeto de estu- do as repercussões...

  15. Who let the dog out? Implementing a successful therapy dog program in an academic law library

    | Contributor(s):: Julian Aiken, Femi Cadmus

    The motivation for introducing a therapy dog to the Yale Law Library was twofold. Inarguably, attending law school can sometimes be stressful. Studies indicate that, particularly in the first year of law school, when newcomers are adjusting to new teaching methods, materials, external and...

  16. New pet visit guidelines aim to control infections

    | Contributor(s):: Lisa Bryden

    No llamas, reptiles or ponies allowed. Those might seem altogether sensible, if not self-evident restrictions when talking about hospitals and long-term care facilities.

  17. Therapy dogs in the emergency department

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Nickolas Nahm, Jill Lubin, Jeffrey Lubin, Blake K. Bankwitz, McAllister Castelaz, Xin Chen, Joel C. Shackson, Manik N. Aggarwal, Vicken Y. Totten

    Introduction: This study examined acceptance by staff and patients of a therapy dog (TD) in the emergency department (ED).Methods: Immediately after TD visits to a University Hospital ED, all available ED staff, patients, and their visitors were invited to complete a survey.Results: Of 125...

  18. Zoonotic disease concerns in animal-assisted therapy and animal visitation programs

    | Contributor(s):: David Waltner-Toews

    A survey was done of 150 systematically selected United States animal care agencies and 74 Canadian humane societies to determine the prevalence of animal assisted therapy (AAT) programs; concerns about, and experience with, zoonotic diseases; and precautions taken to prevent zoonotic disease...