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  1. Inside the Yellow Rectangle: An Analysis of Nonhuman Animal Representations on National Geographic Kids Magazine Covers

    Contributor(s):: Vrla, Stephen, Whitley, Cameron T., Kalof, Linda

    Nonhuman animals play significant roles in children’s lives. While research into children’s relationships with animals is thriving, an overlooked area is children’s vicarious experience of animals through realistic representations in nonfiction books, magazines, and other media. We used content...

  2. "Animals are friends, not food": Anthropomorphism leads to less favorable attitudes toward meat consumption by inducing feelings of anticipatory guilt

    Contributor(s):: Wang, F., Basso, F.

  3. A One Health Perspective on the Human-Companion Animal Relationship with Emphasis on Zoonotic Aspects

    Contributor(s):: Overgaauw, P. A. M., Vinke, C. M., Hagen, Maev, Lipman, L. J. A.

  4. Animal geographies I: Hearing the cry and extending beyond

    Contributor(s):: Gibbs, Leah M.

  5. Milkmaid Bears and Savage Mates: The Cultural Exploitation of Real and Fictive White Bears from the Elizabethan Period to the Present

    Contributor(s):: Woolf, Judith

    The paper considers the cultural exploitation of bears, especially white ones, from the late sixteenth century to the present, both in drama and literary fiction and in the bear pits, theatres, circuses, zoos, and natural habitats in which real biological bears have found themselves mythologized...

  6. Does Anthropomorphism of Dogs Affect Pain Perception in Animal-Assisted Interventions? An Exploratory Study

    Contributor(s):: Turner-Collins, Clare, Breitenbecher, Kimberly H.

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine the effects of anthropomorphism of a therapy dog on pain perception during an animal-assisted intervention. Participants were 32 college women who were randomly assigned to the anthropomorphism condition or the control condition. All...

  7. Dolphins in the Human Mind: What Characteristics Do German Students Attribute to Dolphins, Compared with Apes and Whales? An Exploratory Study

    Contributor(s):: Stumpf, Eva

    Research on anthrozoology has greatly increased in recent decades, especially with regard to anthropomorphism and attitudes toward animals in general. Nevertheless, these studies have rarely distinguished between different nonhuman species. Previous studies have indicated human preferences for...

  8. We Are Family: Viewing Pets as Family Members Improves Wellbeing

    Contributor(s):: McConnell, Allen R., Lloyd, E. Paige, Humphrey, Brandon T.

    The current work investigated how viewing one’s pet as a family member improves wellbeing. We hypothesized that including pets in a key social ingroup (i.e., family) would increase ascriptions of socially supportive traits to these animals, enhancing their perceived ability to provide social...

  9. “He’s so Fluffy I’m Gonna Die!” Cute Responses by Hikers to Autonomous Animals on the Appalachian Trail

    Contributor(s):: Marx, Kate

    The Appalachian Trail is a more than 2,000-mile-long wilderness trail in the Eastern United States. Every year, aspiring long-distance hikers travel from across the US and abroad, intending to hike the entire length of the trail, which takes around 6 months to complete. Numerous species of...

  10. The Anthropomorphic Application of Gender Stereotypes to Horses

    Contributor(s):: Dashper, Katherine, Fenner, Kate, Hyde, Michelle, Probyn-Rapsey, Fiona, Caspar, Georgie, Henshall, Cathrynne, McGreevy, Paul

    Gender stereotypes shape human social interaction, often to the detriment of women and those who do not comply with normative expectations of gender. So far, little research has assessed the extent to which people apply gender stereotypes to animals, and the implications this may have for...

  11. Social Functions of a Pet Graveyard: Analysis of Gravestone Records at the Metropolitan Pet Cemetery in Moscow

    Contributor(s):: Bardina, Svetlana

    Nowadays, pets are often buried, mourned, and remembered as family members; present-day pet cemeteries are starting to resemble human burial grounds. This raises the question of what are the social functions of pet cemeteries. This study is based on the assumption that the main social functions...

  12. Does Human–Animal Similarity Lower the Need to Affirm Humans’ Superiority Relative to Animals? A Social Psychological Viewpoint

    Contributor(s):: Amiot, Catherine E., Sukhanova, Ksenia, Greenaway, Katharine H., Bastian, Brock

    This research integrates different social psychological theories to test whether human–animal similarity promotes affiliation with animals and lowers the need to affirm humans’ superiority relative to animals. On the basis of theories of intergroup relations, terror management theory, and work...

  13. The Anthrozoomorphic Identity: Furry Fandom Members’ Connections to Nonhuman Animals

    Contributor(s):: Roberts, Sharon E., Plante, Courtney N., Gerbasi, Kathleen C., Reysen, Stephen

    We examined furry fandom members’ anthrozoomorphic identity by investigating this subculture's relationship with nonhuman animals. Using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses and two largescale Internet and convention-based studies of furries, we developed (study 1; n=4,338) and replicated...

  14. Seeing Dogs: Human Preferences for Dog Physical Attributes

    Contributor(s):: Hecht, Julie, Horowitz, Alexandra

    This study systematically investigated peoples' preferences for dog physical attributes in images of real-life dogs. Participants (n = 124) completed an aesthetic-preference test wherein they viewed 80 image pairs of mixed-breed adult dogs and were asked which image they “liked best.” In each...

  15. Anthropomorphizing Dogs: Projecting One's Own Personality and Consequences for Supporting Animal Rights

    Contributor(s):: Brown, Christina M., McLean, Julia L.

    The purpose of this paper was twofold: First, to test if people project their own personality traits onto dogs, and second, to examine if considering the psychological state of dogs increases support for animal rights more broadly. In studies 1 and 2, participants read descriptions of dog...

  16. Behavioral assessment and owner perceptions of behaviors associated with guilt in dogs

    Contributor(s):: Hecht, Julie, Miklósi, Ádám, Gácsi, Márta

    Dog owners ascribe guilt to dogs, and we explored this attribution with pet dogs and their owners using a questionnaire and experiment. The questionnaire found that the majority of owners perceive dog behavior as guilty in certain situations and believe that dogs know when they have committed a...

  17. For an Emancipatory Animal Sociology

    Contributor(s):: Taylor, Nik, Sutton, Zoei

  18. Speaking to Animals: Japan and the Welfare of Companion Animals

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Cassandra Atherton, Glenn Moore

    This paper examines the phenomenal popularity of companion animals in Japan, and the way many of these pets are treated as part of the owner’s family. Indeed, some pets are treated as if they are human children. This pet phenomenon was made possible because the Japanese developed a way of...

  19. How psychology can contribute to human-animal welfare? | Hanna Mamzer | TEDxFulbrightWarsaw

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Hanna Mamzer

    Do we understand animals? Do we really know what they need? Or maybe we just give them what WE THINK they need? By getting the knowledge from the combination of psychology and cultural differences we can look at animals as someone coming from other culture. Understanding that animals have their...

  20. Anthropomorphism in Human-Animal Interactions: A Pragmatist View

    | Contributor(s):: Servais, V.