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  1. Horses’ responses to variation in human approach

    Contributor(s):: Birke, Lynda, Hockenhull, Jo, Creighton, Emma, Pinno, Lisa, Mee, Jenny, Mills, Daniel

    The behaviour of humans around horses is thought to have a substantial impact on how people are perceived in subsequent interactions and many horse trainers give detailed advice on how handlers should behave when initially approaching a loose horse. Here we report on three studies designed to...

  2. Mice aversion to sevoflurane, isoflurane and carbon dioxide using an approach-avoidance task

    Contributor(s):: Guedes, Silvana R., Valentim, Ana M., Antunes, Luis M.

    Euthanasia of laboratory animals is one of the main concerns for animal welfare, especially the use of carbon dioxide (CO2) which has been described to induce aversive-like behaviours. In order to refine mass euthanasia in rodents, this study aims to determine which gas, sevoflurane, isoflurane...

  3. Do shelter dogs engage in social referencing with their caregiver in an approach paradigm? An exploratory study

    Contributor(s):: Duranton, Charlotte, Bedossa, Thierry, Gaunet, Florence

    When confronted with an unfamiliar object or person, privately owned pet dogs engage in social referencing, synchronizing their reaction with that of their owners. The question of whether shelter dogs do so when confronted with a stranger has not yet been studied. We tested the reactions of 30...

  4. Assessment of tobacco-related approach and attentional biases in smokers, cravers, ex-smokers, and non-smokers

    Contributor(s):: Woud, Marcella L., Maas, Joyce, Wiers, Reinout W., Becker, Eni S., Rinck, Mike

  5. Combat PTSD and implicit behavioral tendencies for positive affective stimuli: A brief report

    Contributor(s):: Clausen, Ashley N., Youngren, Westley, Sisante, Jason-Flor V., Billinger, Sandra A., Taylor, Charles, Aupperle, Robin L.

  6. Approaching anger in schizophrenia: What an implicit task tells you that self-report does not

    Contributor(s):: Reddy, L. Felice, Green, Michael F., Wynn, Jonathan K., Rinck, Mike, Horan, William P.

  7. Yum, cake!: How reward sensitivity relates to automatic approach motivation for dessert food images

    Contributor(s):: May, Christine N., Juergensen, James, Demaree, Heath A.

  8. Approach bias modification in inpatient psychiatric smokers

    Contributor(s):: Machulska, Alla, Zlomuzica, Armin, Rinck, Mike, Assion, Hans-Jörg, Margraf, Jürgen

  9. Effects of brief behavioural activation on approach and avoidance tendencies in acute depression: Preliminary findings

    Contributor(s):: Nasrin, Farjana, Rimes, Katharine, Reinecke, Andrea, Rinck, Mike, Barnhofer, Thorsten

  10. Explicit and implicit approach vs. avoidance tendencies towards high vs. low calorie food cues in patients with anorexia nervosa and healthy controls

    Contributor(s):: Paslakis, Georgios, Kühn, Simone, Schaubschläger, Anke, Schieber, Katharina, Röder, Kathrin, Rauh, Elisabeth, Erim, Yesim

  11. The pulling power of chocolate: Effects of approach–avoidance training on approach bias and consumption

    Contributor(s):: Dickson, Hugh, Kavanagh, David J., MacLeod, Colin