You are here: Home / Tags / Bait / Conference Proceedings

Tags: Bait

Resources (1-20 of 34)

  1. Zinc phosphide rodenticide reduces cotton rat populations in Florida sugarcane

    Contributor(s):: Nicholas R. Holler, David G. Decker

    Rodents cause extensive damage to sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) in southern Florida (Samol 1972). Losses have been estimated as high as $235/ha (Lefebvre et al. 1978). Cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) and roof rats (Rattus rattus) are responsible for most of the damage (Holler et al. 1981)....

  2. Trapping: A continuous integral part of a rodent control programme

    Contributor(s):: H.R. Shuyler, R.F. Sun Jr.

    Trapping is usually considered a rodent control technique of minor importance. Due to the economic situation in the Dumaguete, Philippines program from which this report is drawn, regular trapping was a biological necessity. Four species of rodents and a shrew were of concern. A continuing daily...

  3. A novel strategy for pocket gopher control

    Contributor(s):: Michael E.R. Godfrey

    Current techniques for the control of pocket gophers use traps, fumigants or toxic baits. Trapping and fumigation are labor intensive and seldom effective in giving more than short-term relief. Toxic baiting usually uses baits that are rapidly degraded and although the resident gopher may be...

  4. Hazards to wildlife associated with underground strychnine baiting for pocket gophers

    Contributor(s):: Paul L. Hegdal, Thomas A. Gatz

    Under an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) contract, we evaluated the hazards associated with strychnine baiting for pocket gophers (Geomys bursarius) with the burrow-builder. On the Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge, Minnesota, we treated 662 ha (1638 acres) with 0.5 percent...

  5. Pindone for rabbit control: efficacy, residues and cost

    Contributor(s):: Peter C. Nelson, Graham J. Hickling

    Toxins are a major component of rabbit control campaigns in New Zealand, with sodium monofluoroacetate (1080) being the primary toxin in use since the 1950s. However, landowners can use 1080 only under the direct supervision of a licensed operator, and rabbit populations in regularly-poisoned...

  6. Metoclopramide hydrochloride did not prevent 1080-induced vomiting in coyotes

    Contributor(s):: Jeffrey S. Green

    Vomiting is a characteristic, although undesirable effect when using Compound 1080 (sodium monofluoroacetate) as a method of predator control for coyotes. Compound 1080 meat baits with (treatment) and without (control) an antiemetic, metoclopramide hydrochloride (MH), were fed to captive coyotes...