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  1. Public Perceptions and Knowledge of, and Responses to, Bats in Urban Areas in Peninsular Malaysia

    Contributor(s):: Lim, Voon-Ching, Wilson, John-James

    Urbanization has resulted in the loss of natural habitat for many bat species, often placing bats in close proximity to humans. Bats are generally perceived as agricultural and medical pests, despite providing ecosystem services including seed dispersal and pollination. Understanding public...

  2. Knowledge and Perceptions of, and Attitudes to, Bats by People Living around Arabuko-Sokoke Forest, Malindi-Kenya

    Contributor(s):: Musila, Simon, Prokop, Pavol, Gichuki, Nathan

    Bat populations continue to decline worldwide because of myriad human activities. To enhance bat conservation, human behavior needs to change. Such change can occur, in part, through an understanding of what motivates human actions toward bats. We used a Bat Attitude Questionnaire (BAQ) to...

  3. Socio-cultural Determinants of Human–Bat Interactions in Rural Ghana

    Contributor(s):: Ohemeng, Fidelia, Lawson, Elaine T., Ayivor, Jesse, Leach, Melissa, Waldman, Linda, Ntiamoa-Baidu, Yaa

    Bats are known to be a natural reservoir for a lot of disease pathogens and can spread several diseases. All 11 genera of fruit bat found in West Africa are found in Ghana, and human–bat interactions are common. However, there is a dearth of knowledge about the socio-cultural factors that shape...

  4. What vaccinating vampire bats can teach us about pandemics | Daniel Streicker

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Daniel Streicker

    Could we anticipate the next big disease outbreak, stopping a virus like Ebola before it ever strikes? In this talk about frontline scientific research, ecologist Daniel Streicker takes us to the Amazon rainforest in Peru where he tracks the movement of vampire bats in order to forecast and...

  5. The Ties that Bind: One Health | Sharon Deem | TEDxGatewayArchSalon

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Sharon Deem

    Sharon discusses the idea of One World Health - plants, animals and humans need to find a path to balance. As man disrupts the natural systems it disrupts the health of other living things which in turn cause problems that were not obviously predictable. We need to be aware of the disruptions...

  6. Hendra Virus Vaccine, a One Health Approach to Protecting Horse, Human, and Environmental Health

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Deborah Middleton, Jackie Pallister, Reuben Klein, Yan-Ru Feng, Jessica Haining, Rachel Arkinstall, Leah Frazer, Jin-An Huang, Nigel Edwards, Mark Wareing, Martin Elhay, Zia Hashmi, John Bingham, Manabu Yamada, Dayna Johnson, John White, Adam Foord, Hans G. Heine, Glenn A. Marsh, Christopher C. Broder, Lin-Fa Wang

    In recent years, the emergence of several highly pathogenic  zoonotic  diseases in humans has led to a renewed emphasis on the interconnectedness of human, animal, and environmental health, otherwise known as One Health. For example, Hendra virus...

  7. Can you catch Ebola from a stork bite? Inductive reasoning influences generalization of perceived zoonosis risk

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Tyler Davis, Micah B. Goldwater, Molly E. Ireland, Nicholas Gaylord, Jason Van Allen

    Emerging zoonoses are a prominent global health threat. Human beliefs are central to drivers of emerging zoonoses, yet little is known about how people make inferences about risk in such scenarios. We present an inductive account of zoonosis risk perception, suggesting that beliefs about the...

  8. Wild Health: Dogs and Bats and Chickens, Oh My!

    | Contributor(s):: Voelker, R.

    2019Jama321181756-17570098-748410.1001/jama.2019.2026engtext

  9. Knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding rabies and exposure to bats in two rural communities in Guatemala

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: David Moran, Patricia Juliao, Danilo Alvarez, Kim A Lindblade, James A Ellison, Amy T Gilbert, Brett Petersen, Charles Rupprecht, Sergio Recuenco

    Background Rabies is a fatal encephalitis caused by rabies virus, of the genus Lyssavirus. The principal reservoir for rabies in Latin America is the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), which feeds routinely on the blood of cattle, and when livestock are scarce, may prey on...

  10. Viral Zoonoses That Fly with Bats: A Review

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Alfonso Calderon, Camilo Guzman, Jorge Salazar-Bravo, Luiz Tadeu Figueiredo, Salim Mattar, German Arrieta

    Emerging infectious diseases are a growing threat to human health and a great challenge for global medical attention systems. Governmental agencies in tropical regions with abundant zoonotic pathogens should implement an active vigilance/monitoring model in bat reservoir populations because of...

  11. Modeling The Zoonotic Transmission Dynamics Of Nipah Virus: Implications For Outbreak Control And Model-Guided Fieldwork

    | Contributor(s):: Natasha Wenzel

    Introduction: Nipah virus is considered a biosafety level-4 pathogen that is endemic to bats of the genus Pteropus. Infection in humans presents clinically as febrile encephalitis with an extremely high case-fatality rate (78.2%). Outbreaks of Nipah virus infection have occurred in Bangladesh and...

  12. Bats and Rabies in Utah

    | Contributor(s):: Nicki Frey

    This fact sheet describes the 10 species of bats found in Utah, what to do if you are bitten and how to avoid contracting diseases from them.

  13. Bats, bananas and bugs: Rob Mies at TEDxDetroit

    | Contributor(s):: Rob Mies

    Bats are one of the animals we rely on to keep us healthy, but how? In this talk, Rob Mies shares why we need to keep bats around and how saving bats can be fun, simple and social. Plus, Rob brings live bats on stage including a Malayan Flying Fox, the largest species of bat in the world with a...

  14. Embodying evil and bad luck. Stray notes on the folklore of bats in southwest Asia

    | Contributor(s):: Frembgen, Jürgen Wasim

  15. Less common house pets

    | Contributor(s):: Chomel, B. B., Schlossberg, D.

    This chapter focuses on the major health threats associated with exposure of humans to less common house pets. The viral, bacterial, parasitic and mycotic zoonoses transmitted by pet rabbits, rodents, reptiles, amphibians, ornamental aquarium fish, ferrets, bats and nonhuman primates are...

  16. Characteristics of urban constructions occupied by bats

    | Contributor(s):: Robin Vander Pol, Kenneth Wilkins (adviser)

    Certain bat species like Myotis velifer (cave myotis), Pipistrellus subflavus (eastern pipistrelle), and Tadarida brasiliensis (Mexican free-tailed) of Waco, Texas roost in buildings, sometimes even when more natural roosting structures are available. However, not much research has been done...

  17. A framework for the study of zoonotic disease emergence and its drivers: spillover of bat pathogens as a case study

    | Contributor(s):: James L. N. Wood, Melissa Leach, Linda Waldman, Hayley MacGregor, Anthony R. Fooks, Kate E. Jones, Olivier Restif, Dina Dechmann, David T. S. Hayman, Kate S. Baker, Alison J. Peel, Alexandra O. Kamins, Jakob Fahr, Yaa Ntiamoa-Baidu, Richard Suu-Ire, Robert F. Breiman, Jonathan H. Epstein, Hume E. Field, Andrew A. Cunningham

    Many serious emerging zoonotic infections have recently arisen from bats, including Ebola, Marburg, SARS-coronavirus, Hendra, Nipah, and a number of rabies and rabies-related viruses, consistent with the overall observation that wildlife are an important source of emerging zoonoses for the human...

  18. Attitudes toward animals: a study of Portuguese children

    | Contributor(s):: Almeida, A., Vasconcelos, C., Strecht-Ribeiro, O.

    In this study we analyzed the attitudes toward different animals in 210 Portuguese children: 107 boys and 103 girls, aged between 8 and 10 years, attending the 3rd and 4th years of primary school. We used a questionnaire with two distinct parts. In the first part, the children were asked about...

  19. Observations on bats at Badlands National Park, South Dakota

    | Contributor(s):: Michael A. Bogan, Jeffrey G. Osborne, Jennifer A. Clarke

    During the summers of 1992 and 1993, we conducted a survey of bats at Badlands National Park, South Dakota. Using mist nets, we captured bats and recorded species, sex, age class, and reproductive condition for each individual netted. We recorded five species, Myotis ciliolabrnm (n = 198), M....

  20. Development of frequency modulated vocalizations in big brown bat pups

    | Contributor(s):: Heather W. Mayberry, Dr. Paul A. Faure (adviser)

    Developing bat pups produce distinct vocalizations called isolation calls (I‐calls) that serve to attract the bat's mother. Mothers use spatial memory, auditory and olfactory cues to reunite with their offspring. Because I‐calls are unique to individual pups, vocalizations are crucial for the...