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  1. A note on the behavior of feral cattle in the Chihuahuan Desert of Mexico

    Contributor(s):: Hernandez, L., Barral, H., Halffter, G., Colon, S. S.

    Habitat use and behaviour of three feral cows were compared to three domestic cows in the Mapimi Biosphere Reserve, Chihuahuan Desert, where approximately 1000 feral cows were found on 151 000 ha. Feral cattle were found to represent an ecotype adapted to desert conditions. In comparison with...

  2. Animal-visitor interactions in the modern zoo: conflicts and interventions

    Contributor(s):: Fernandez, E. J., Tamborski, M. A., Pickens, S. R., Timberlake, W.

    Animal welfare, education, conservation, research, and entertainment are major goals of modern zoos, but they can be in conflict. For example, visitors enjoy learning about and observing natural behavior in captive animals, but visitors often want to observe and interact with the animals in close...

  3. Landscape nutritional patterns and cattle distribution in rangeland pastures

    Contributor(s):: Ganskopp, D. C., Bohnert, D. W.

    On rangelands, uneven or unmanaged livestock distribution can adversely affect plant community composition, riparian function, or displace wildlife. These issues have historic precedents and are still a challenge for those managing rangelands. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms governing...

  4. Stereotypies in female farm mink ( Mustela vison ) may be genetically transmitted and associated with higher fertility due to effects on body weight

    Contributor(s):: Jeppesen, L. L., Heller, K. E., Bildsoe, M.

    Two lines of female farm mink were selected among the offspring of 495 mothers kept under conventional farm conditions. A low-stereotyping line (n=146) arose from 75 non-stereotyping females and a high-stereotyping line (n=150) was established from the 75 most stereotyping females. In two...

  5. Behavioral differences between provisioned and non-provisioned Barbary macaques ( Macaca sylvanus )

    Contributor(s):: Unwin, T., Smith, A.

    The majority of Gibraltar's Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus) are provided with fruit and vegetable rations to keep them in the nature reserve and away from town. Recent fissioning of one troop has created a vagrant group that is denied access to official feeding sites by other troops, and which...

  6. Interactions between visitors and Formosan macaques ( Macaca cyclopis ) at Shou-Shan Nature Park, Taiwan

    Contributor(s):: Hsu, M. J., Kao, ChienChing, Agoramoorthy, G.

    Ecotourism involving feeding wildlife has raised public attention and is a controversial issue, especially concerning nonhuman primates. Between July 2002 and April 2005, the behavior of monkeys and tourists was collected through scan samplings, focal samplings and behavior samplings at the...

  7. The effect of visiting zoos on human health and quality of life

    Contributor(s):: Sakagami, T., Ohta, M.

    The increased mental stress of daily life and aging of the population are serious matters in Japan. There are many studies regarding the effects of human-animal interactions on mental and physical human health, whereas there are few studies examining the effects of visiting zoos. To determine the...

  8. Factors affecting the likelihood of release of injured and orphaned woodpigeons ( Columba palumbus )

    Contributor(s):: Kelly, A., Halstead, C., Hunter, D., Leighton, K., Grogan, A., Harris, M.

    Very little is known about the fate of the large numbers of injured and orphaned wild animals taken to wildlife rehabilitation centres in the UK each year. We reviewed the reasons for admission and outcomes for 2,653 woodpigeons (Columba palumbus), 68% of which were juveniles, brought to an RSPCA...

  9. Four types of activities that affect animals: implications for animal welfare science and animal ethics philosophy

    Contributor(s):: Fraser, D., MacRae, A. M.

    People affect animals through four broad types of activity: (1) people keep companion, farm, laboratory and captive wild animals, often while using them for some purpose; (2) people cause deliberate harm to animals through activities such as slaughter, pest control, hunting, and toxicology...

  10. Taking the time to assess the effects of remote sensing and tracking devices on animals

    Contributor(s):: McMahon, C. R., Collier, N., Northfield, J. K., Glen, F.

    The remote monitoring of animal behaviour using telemetry and bio-logging has become popular due to technological advances, falling costs of devices and the need to understand behaviour without causing disturbance to subjects. Over the past three decades thousands of animals have had their...

  11. All creatures great and minute: a public policy primer for companion animal zoonoses

    Contributor(s):: Reaser, J. K., Clark, E. E., Jr., Meyers, N. M.

    Approximately 63% of US households have at least one pet, a large percentage of which are considered family members. Pet owners can derive substantial physical and psychological benefits from interaction with companion animals. However, pet ownership is not without risks; zoonotic diseases are...

  12. Demography and dog-human relationships of the dog population in Zimbabwean communal lands

    Contributor(s):: Butler, J. R. A., Bingham, J.

    Dogs are Zimbabwe's primary vector for rabies, and the majority live in communal lands (traditional agropastoralist rural areas). In 1994, a household questionnaire survey was conducted to provide baseline data on the demography and dog-human relationships of the dogs in the communal lands. The...

  13. Global perspectives on animal welfare: Africa. (Special issue: Animal welfare: global issues, trends and challenges)

    Contributor(s):: Masiga, W. N., Munyua, S. J. M.

    Livestock production systems, production objectives, the cultural values of livestock keepers, and the close relationship between keepers and their livestock have evolved over the years and have influenced the quality of animal welfare in Africa. An equivalent level and quality of care is not...

  14. Rangifer and man: an ancient relationship

    Contributor(s):: Gordon, B.

    A long-term relationship between Rangifer and humans is documented in three case studies: the Canadian Barrenlands (8000 years ago to Historic period), Ice-Age France (11 000-19 000 years ago) and Mesolithic Russia (7000-10 000 years ago). Ancient human and herd migration occurred in all areas,...

  15. Survival, fecundity, and movements of free-roaming cats

    Contributor(s):: Schmidt, P. M., Lopez, R. R., Collier, B. A.

    Free-roaming cats (e.g., owned, semi-feral, and feral) impact wildlife worldwide through predation, competition, and disease transmission. Baseline ecological information necessary for population management is lacking. We radiocollared free-roaming cats (feral, n=30; semi-feral, n=14; owned,...

  16. The living world from the aspect of animal behaviour. 78. Monkey mother offspring relationship resembling man? Are they different? [Japanese]

    Contributor(s):: Kikusui, T.

  17. A biotechnological agenda for the Third World

    Contributor(s):: Goldstein, D. J.

    It is argued that Third World countries should exploit the genetic information stored in their flora and fauna to develop independent and highly competitive biotechnological and pharmaceutical industries. The necessary condition for this policy to succeed is the reshaping of their universities...

  18. Biofuels: efficiency, ethics, and limits to human appropriation of ecosystem services

    Contributor(s):: Gomiero, T., Paoletti, M. G., Pimentel, D.

    Biofuels have lately been indicated as a promising source of cheap and sustainable energy. In this paper we argue that some important ethical and environmental issues have also to be addressed: (1) the conflict between biofuels production and global food security, particularly in developing...

  19. Conservation of biodiversity within Canadian agricultural landscapes: integrating habitat for wildlife

    Contributor(s):: Mineau, P., McLaughlin, A.

    Industrialized agriculture currently substitutes for many of the ecological functions of soil microorganisms, macroinvertebrates, wild plants, and vertebrate animals with high cost inputs of pesticides and fertilizers. Enhanced biological diversity potentially offers agricultural producers a...

  20. Economic incentives for tropical forest preservation: why and how?

    Contributor(s):: Katzman, M. T., Cale, W. G., Jr.

    A discussion in the context of Amazonia of: factors that militate against tropical countries being concerned about habitat destruction; arguments in favour of habitat preservation; institutions that might satisfy development aspirations of Amazonian nations and account for global benefits of...