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  1. Attitude toward Companion and Guard Dogs in Hawaii: Health and Welfare Implications

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Lynn Morrison, Julie Ann Luiz Adrian, Marina Kelley, Johana Hill, Zachariah Tman, Dana-lynn Ko'omoa-Lange

    The island of Hawaii exhibits extremes in dog welfare ranging from dogs as family members to dogs used as commodities, either as guard or hunting dogs, with many lacking appropriate care. This study offers a preliminary exploration of people’s attitudes toward companion and noncompanion...

  2. Dogs and blood pressure in non-dog owners

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Natasha Adamson

    Several studies have shown that the presence of a dog can reduce blood pressure during a stressful situation. A study done in 2001 demonstrated that for blood pressure to be reduced during a stressor the subjects must be dog owners. The purpose of this experiment was to determine if four, one...

  3. Exploring Dog-Assisted Interventions in Higher Education: Students' Attitudes and Perceived Effects on Well-Being

    | Contributor(s):: Rothkopf, C., Schworm, S.

  4. Interaction with Caged Budgerigars (Melopsittacus Undulatus) Enhances Human Affect

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jones, Autumn G., Skolnick, Alexander J., Anderson, Matthew J.

    Research interest in the benefits of human–animal interaction (HAI) has grown within the scientific community. One current limitation in the HAI literature however, is that the majority of research focuses on the beneficial effects of dogs and cats, paying less attention to other species...

  5. Does Viewing a Picture of a Pet During a Mental Arithmetic Task Lower Stress Levels?

    | Contributor(s):: Ein, Natalie, Hadad, Marilyn, Reed, Maureen J., Vickers, Kristin

    Pets can reduce stress in their owner; however, they are not always permitted in public and institutional places. This study examined the impact of people viewing a picture of their pet versus other images on stress levels. One hundred and twenty participants were randomly assigned to one of six...

  6. The Effects of a Therapy Dog on the Blood Pressure and Heart Rate of Older Residents in a Nursing Home

    | Contributor(s):: Handlin, Linda, Nilsson, Anne, Lidfors, Lena, Petersson, Maria, Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin

    The aim of the present project was to investigate whether repeated visits by a therapy dog to nursing homes might affect the older residents’ systolic blood pressure and heart rate. A secondary aim was to investigate and compare effects (differences in responses) in older people with high and...

  7. Beliefs About Animal Assisted Interventions Among Medical Social Workers

    | Contributor(s):: Gyda D. Boyd

    Animal‑Assisted Intervention (AAI) is used to significantly reduce pain, lower blood pressure, decrease anxiety, and help ease depression in people with a range of health problems; however, it is not readily used in the hospital setting. Research involving the Human‑Animal Bond (HAB) is well...

  8. Hippotherapy acute impact on heart rate variability non-linear dynamics in neurological disorders

    | Contributor(s):: Cabiddu, R.

  9. Doctors and nurses join the puppy love

  10. Physiological effects of a companion robot on blood pressure of older people in residential care facility: a pilot study

    | Contributor(s):: Robinson, H., MacDonald, B., Broadbent, E.

  11. Pet ownership and risk factors for cardiovascular disease

    | Contributor(s):: Anderson, W. P., Reid, C. M., Jennings, G. L.

  12. Dog interaction with persons receiving institutional geriatric care

    | Contributor(s):: Neer, C. A., Dorn, C. R., Grayson, I.

  13. Physiological responses of college students to a pet

    | Contributor(s):: Wilson, C. C.

  14. The "pet effect": physiological calming in the presence of canines

    | Contributor(s):: Wheeler, E. A., Faulkner, M. E.

    The "pet effect," whereby interaction with a companion animal reduces the physiological indices of stress, varies with respect to fear of animals, companion animal guardianship, type of companion animal, or types of stress. In this study, a non-clinical sample of 223 undergraduates underwent the...

  15. The Role of an Animal-Mascot in the Psychological Adjustment of Soldiers Exposed to Combat Stress

    | Contributor(s):: Trousselard, Marion, Jean, Aurelie, Beiger, François, Marchandot, Florent, Davoust, Bernard, Canini, Frédéric

  16. Healthy Pets Healthy People

    Most households in the United States have at least one pet. Why do people have pets? There are many reasons. Pets can decrease your blood pressure, cholesterol levels, triglyceride levels, and feelings of loneliness. Pets can increase your opportunities for exercise and outdoor activities and...

  17. Physiological effects of human-animal positive interaction in dogs - review of the literature

    | Contributor(s):: Pop, D., Rusu, A. S., Pop-Vancia, V., Papuc, I., Constantinescu, R., Miresan, V.

    Positive human-animal interactions (HAI) are known to increase the quality of life in both humans and dogs. Although there are several reviews on the benefits of HAI in humans, there are no reviews on the effects of positive HAI in dogs. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to provide a review of...

  18. Effect of dog-walking on autonomic nervous activity in senior citizens.

    | Contributor(s):: Motooka M, Koike H, Yokoyama T, Kennedy NL

  19. Do audible and ultrasonic sounds of intensities common in animal facilities affect the autonomic nervous system of rodents?

    | Contributor(s):: Burwell, A. K., Baldwin, A. L.

    In animal facilities, noises, often poorly controlled, occur over a wide range of frequencies and intensities. Evidence demonstrates that audible noise and ultrasound have deleterious effects on rodent physiology, but it is not known how they affect the autonomic nervous system (ANS). This study...

  20. Cardiovascular responses to a pet snake

    | Contributor(s):: Alonso, Y.