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  1. Aggressive, Submissive, and Affiliative Behavior in Sanctuary Chimpanzees (Pan Troglodytes) During Social Integration

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Fultz, Amy, Yanagi, Akie, Breaux, Sarah, Beaupre, Leilani

    Chimp Haven is a sanctuary for chimpanzees being retired from biomedical research and from facilities that can no longer care for them. Chimpanzees often live in smaller groups in captive settings; however, Chimp Haven integrates them into larger, more species-typical groups. Social...

  2. Long-Term Spatial Restriction Generates Deferred Limited Space Use in a Zoo-Housed Chimpanzee Group

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Duncan, Luke Mangaliso, D’Egidio Kotze, Chiara, Pillay, Neville

    Background: Appropriate space is considered paramount for good captive animal welfare. There has been a concerted effort by captive institutions, particularly zoos, to provide captive animals with relatively large, naturalistic enclosures which havehad demonstrated welfare benefits for animals....

  3. Re-Evaluating Captive Chimpanzee "Dominance": Dominance Hierarchy and Chimpanzee-Caregiver Relationships at Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jake Alan Funkhouser

    This thesis is composed of two journal-ready articles and an accompanying appendix with additional data and interpretation. Overall, this thesis describes and statistically analyzes dominance relationships in two nonhuman primate groups with novel methods, possible correlations between...

  4. A Comparison of Chimpanzee (Pan Troglodytes) Responses to Caregiver Use of Positive Reinforcement Training (PRT) and Species-Specific Behaviors (SSB)

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Whitney D. Emge

    The present study compared the effects of positive reinforcement training (PRT) and unstructured interactions (UI) on chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) behavior. In the PRT condition, a caregiver interacted with a chimpanzee to condition behaviors for 10 min. In the UI condition, a caregiver...

  5. Behavioural diversity as a potential welfare indicator for professionally managed chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): Exploring variations in calculating diversity using species-specific behaviours

    | Contributor(s):: Hall, K., Bryant, J., Staley, M., Whitham, J. C., Miller, L. J.

  6. Between-task consistency, temporal stability and the role of posture in simple reach and fishing hand preference in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    | Contributor(s):: Díaz, Sergio, Murray, Lindsay, Roberts, Sam G. B., Rodway, Paul

  7. Does mirror enrichment improve primate well-being?

    | Contributor(s):: de Groot, B., Cheyne, S. M.

  8. Experimentally evaluating the function of self-directed behaviour in two adult mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx)

    | Contributor(s):: Leeds, A., Lukas, K. E.

  9. Refinements to captive chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) care: a self-medication paradigm

    | Contributor(s):: Webb, S. J. N., Hau, J., Schapiro, S. J.

  10. Looking for Visitor's Effect in Sanctuaries: Implications of Guided Visitor Groups on the Behavior of the Chimpanzees at Fundació Mona

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jana López-Álvarez, Yaiza Sanjorge, Sara Soloaga, Dietmar Crailsheim, Miquel Llorente

    The question of ‘if and how captive primates are affected by visitors’ has gained increasing attention over the last decades. Although the majority reported undesirable effects on behavior and wellbeing, many studies reported contradicting results. Most of these studies were...

  11. Effects of Rearing on the Behaviour of Zoo-Housed Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    | Contributor(s):: Spiezio, C., Vaglio, S., Vandelle, C., Sandri, C., Regaiolli, B.

  12. The ability to recognize dog emotions depends on the cultural milieu in which we grow up

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Amici, F., Waterman, J., Kellermann, C. M., Karimullah, K., Bräuer, J.

    Inter-specific emotion recognition is especially adaptive when species spend a long time in close association, like dogs and humans. Here, we comprehensively studied the human ability to recognize facial expressions associated with dog emotions (hereafter, emotions). Participants were presented...

  13. Metagenomic analysis of dental calculus in ancient Egyptian baboons

    | Contributor(s):: Ottoni, C., Guellil, M., Ozga, A. T., Stone, A. C., Kersten, O., Bramanti, B., Porcier, S., Van Neer, W.

  14. Utilitarianism for animals, Kantianism for people? Harming animals and humans for the greater good

    | Contributor(s):: Caviola, Lucius, Kahane, Guy, Everett, Jim A. C., Teperman, Elliot, Savulescu, Julian, Faber, Nadira S.

  15. Human caregivers are integrated social partners for captive chimpanzees

    | Contributor(s):: Funkhouser, J. A., Mayhew, J. A., Mulcahy, J. B., Sheeran, L. K.

  16. Chimpanzees use multiple strategies to limit aggression and stress during spatial density changes

    | Contributor(s):: Duncan, Luke Mangaliso, Jones, Megan Anne, van Lierop, Mathew, Pillay, Neville

    The regulation of aggression in captive animals is an important welfare concern. Captive environments typically provide limited space for animals and many species exhibit heightened aggression in response to spatial restriction. However, primates appear to regulate aggression under these...

  17. Behavioral correlates and welfare implications of informal interactions between caretakers and zoo-housed chimpanzees and gorillas

    | Contributor(s):: Chelluri, Gita I., Ross, Stephen R., Wagner, Katherine E.

    In captive animal facilities, human staff members are a relevant part of the animals’ social environment in addition to providing care and managing the social group. Structured, predictable interactions and relaxed, spontaneous contacts may all affect the animals’ behavior and well-being, both...

  18. Volunteer experience influences the conclusions of behavioural experiments

    | Contributor(s):: Duncan, Luke Mangaliso, Pillay, Neville

    Volunteers offer an inexpensive and rapid means of collecting behavioural data, but their reliability is often overlooked. Past research has suggested that observers that were inexperienced are equally adept at recording behaviour as experienced observers, and inexperience was regarded as being...

  19. Physiological and welfare consequences of transport, relocation, and acclimatization of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    | Contributor(s):: Schapiro, Steven J., Lambeth, Susan P., Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj, Williams, Lawrence E., Nehete, Bharti N., Nehete, Pramod N.

    Manipulations of the environments of captive nonhuman primates often have welfare consequences to the animals, including behavioral effects, and for certain manipulations, physiological effects as well. The processes of transporting, relocating, and acclimatizing nonhuman primates across...

  20. Chimpanzees with positive welfare are happier, extraverted, and emotionally stable

    | Contributor(s):: Robinson, Lauren M., Altschul, Drew M., Wallace, Emma K., Úbeda, Yulán, Llorente, Miquel, Machanda, Zarin, Slocombe, Katie E., Leach, Matthew C., Waran, Natalie K., Weiss, Alexander

    Facilities housing captive animals are full of staff who, every day, interact with the animals under their care. The expertise and familiarity of staff can be used to monitor animal welfare by means of questionnaires. It was the goal of our study to examine the association between chimpanzee (Pan...