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  1. An analysis of human-coyote relationship in metropolitan Atlanta, Ga

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jeremy W. Hooper

    Human-coyote interactions are an increasing challenge for North American wildlife managers. My objectives were to: 1) provide data on the types and general spatial distribution of human-coyote interactions in metropolitan Atlanta; 2) identify landscapes associated with human-coyote...

  2. Prisoners in War: Zoos and Zoo Animals During Human Conflict 1870-1947

    | Contributor(s):: Clelly Johnson

        Animals are sentient beings capable of many of the same feelings experienced by humans. They mourn a loss, they feel love and loyalty, and they experience fear. During wars and conflicts, fear is a prevailing emotion among humans, who worry for their wellbeing. Animals,...

  3. Coexistence : the human/grizzly bear interface in a rural community of British Columbia

    | Contributor(s):: Gillian L. Sanders

    Environmental Education is becoming increasingly important as human populations expand into wildlife habitat, often resulting in human/wildlife conflicts. Meadow Creek British Columbia has experienced a long history of conflicts with grizzly bears resulting in significant bear mortalities. This...

  4. Tracking the Elephant (Lexodonta africana) Corridor and the Human-Wildlife Conflict in Selela Village

    | Contributor(s):: Nicole Chlebek, Laura Stalter

    The beastly journey of long-distance migration for the African Elephant (Lexodonta Africana) is important for upholding their connections between diminishing protected areas, especially in northeastern Tanzania. However, human development is encroaching into these corridors, creating a...

  5. Does Gender Matter? Human Elephant Conflict in Sri Lanka: A Gendered Analysis of Human Elephant Conflict and Natural Resource Management in a Rural Sri Lankan Village

    | Contributor(s):: Katherine Eileen Griffin

    This study is a gendered analysis of natural resource management at the local scale of a poor rural Sri Lankan village in a conservation buffer zone. This village experiences destruction of forests and human elephant conflict. The objective of this study is to gain an in-depth knowledge of...

  6. Social Conflict and Human-Coyote Interactions in Suburban Denver

    | Contributor(s):: Draheim, Megan M.

    In 2009, Greenwood Village and Centennial, Colorado (two bordering suburban towns south of Denver), passed coyote management plans in response to community concerns over human-coyote interactions. Although both plans are similar in many respects, theydiffer in some key ways, including...

  7. Understanding Human-Large Carnivore Conflict in Chobe, Botswana

    | Contributor(s):: Sahil Nijhawan

    Large carnivores most often get in conflicts with people because they compete for resources that humans require-space and food. Throughout Africa, large carnivores have been eliminated or significantly reduced because of livestock predation. This study is part of the Large Carnivore Research...

  8. Examining Human-Elephant Conflict in Southern Africa: Causes and Options for Coexistence

    | Contributor(s):: M. Zoe Warner

    Though African elephants (Loxodonta africana) are listed as endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN), efforts to protect and conserve the species have been complicated by human-elephant conflict (HEC). Land conflicts may be the greatest...

  9. Conflict and connection: A theoretical and evaluative study of an equine-assisted psychotherapy program for at-risk and delinquent girls

    | Contributor(s):: Foley, Allison Jan

  10. The intergenerational transmission of family violence and the role of the companion animal in the family system

    | Contributor(s):: King-Ferro, Debra Anne

  11. Knowledge, attitudes, and opinions about human-wildlife conflicts held by community leaders in Virginia

    | Contributor(s):: Regina M. Elsner

    Using a mail survey, I questioned 490 representatives of local government (i.e., elected officials, administrative officials, animal control officers, and county Cooperative Extension agents) about their understanding of human-wildlife conflicts in their communities, and their receptivity to...