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  1. Environmentally enriching American mink ( Neovison vison) increases lymphoid organ weight and skeletal symmetry, and reveals differences between two sub-types of stereotypic behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Diez-Leon, M., Bursian, S., Galicia, D., Napolitano, A., Palme, R., Mason, G.

    Enrichment studies for wild carnivores (e.g., in zoos) are often short-term, use enrichments of unknown motivational significance, and focus on glucocorticoids and stereotypic behaviour (SB), ignoring other stress-relevant variables. Our study assessed the broad behavioural and physiological...

  2. Effect of cage type on fecal corticosterone concentration in buck rabbits during the reproductive cycle

    Contributor(s):: Cornale, P., Macchi, E., Renna, M., Prola, L., Perona, G., Mimosi, A.

    Fecal corticosterone concentration (FCC) was measured in 14 buck rabbits individually housed in standard-dimension cages (SC) or in bigger cages (BC; with a volume more than double that of SC and equipped with a plastic foot mat) during 4 consecutive reproductive cycles. Cage type and...

  3. A case study: fecal corticosteroid and behavior as indicators of welfare during relocation of an Asian elephant

    Contributor(s):: Laws, N., Ganswindt, A., Heistermann, M., Harris, M., Harris, S., Sherwin, C.

    This study was a preliminary investigation of an enzyme immunoassay for measuring fecal glucocorticoid metabolites in a male Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) by investigating changes in behavior and cortisol metabolite excretion associated with a putative stressful event. The study collected...

  4. Captive coyotes compared to their counterparts in the wild: does environmental enrichment help?

    Contributor(s):: Shivik, J. A., Palmer, G. L., Gese, E. M., Osthaus, B.

    This article attempts to determine the effects of environment (captive or wild) and a simple form of environmental enrichment on the behavior and physiology of a nonhuman animal. Specifically, analyses first compared behavioral budgets and stereotypic behavior of captive coyotes (Canis latrans)...

  5. Effect of breed, cage type, and reproductive phase on fecal corticosterone levels in doe rabbits

    Contributor(s):: Prola, L., Cornale, P., Renna, M., Macchi, E., Perona, G., Mimosi, A.

    Fecal corticosterone concentration (FCC) is increasingly being used as a noninvasive indicator of stress in assessment of nonhuman animal welfare. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of breed, cage type, reproductive phase, and their interactions on FCC levels in doe rabbits. A total of...

  6. The effects of environmental control on cognition in rats ( Rattus norvegicus )

    Contributor(s):: Alliger, A. A., Moller, P.

    The aim of this study was to allow nonhuman animals to control their environment using operant conditioning procedures and to assess the effect of control on cognitive tasks. The study tested 4 predictions: (a) rats (Rattus norvegicus) will control a light stimulus; (b) animals will exhibit...

  7. There's a rat in my room! Now what? Mice show no chronic physiological response to the presence of rats

    Contributor(s):: Meijer, M. K., Loo, P. L. P. van, Baumans, V.

    In general, guidelines on housing and care of animals in the laboratory state that rats and mice should not be housed in the same room. Mice may perceive rats as predators. Although one theory says this can cause stress, there is little scientific evidence to support this theory. In the wild,...

  8. Urinary corticosterone levels in mice in response to intraperitoneal injections with saline

    Contributor(s):: Meijer, M. K., Lemmens, A. G., Zutphen, B. F. M. van, Baumans, V.

    The concept of refinement is an important issue in the field of laboratory animal science. Refinement-based research aims to improve animal welfare, to increase the reliability of experimental outcome, and to diminish variation. In search of refinement of experimental techniques, this study...

  9. Effects of growth pattern and dietary protein level during rearing on feed intake, eating time, eating rate, behavior, plasma corticosterone concentration, and feather cover in broiler breeder females during the rearing and laying period

    Contributor(s):: Emous, R. A. van, Kwakkel, R., Krimpen, M. van, Hendriks, W.

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of growth patterns (GP) and dietary crude protein levels (CP) during rearing (2-22 weeks of age) on feed intake, eating time, eating rate, behavior, plasma corticosterone concentration, and feather cover in broiler breeder females during the...

  10. Natural incubation patterns and the effects of exposing eggs to light at various times during incubation on post-hatch fear and stress responses in broiler (meat) chickens

    Contributor(s):: Archer, G. S., Mench, J. A.

    Although environmental conditions during incubation can affect poultry welfare, one factor often overlooked in the commercial incubation of eggs is light. Light stimulation during embryonic development is now known to affect the physiology and behavior of broiler (meat) chickens post-hatch, but...

  11. Behavioural testing to determine differences between coping styles in grey parrots ( Psittacus erithacus erithacus) with and without feather damaging behaviour

    Contributor(s):: Zeeland, Y. R. A. van, Aa, M. M. J. A. van der, Vinke, C. M., Lumeij, J. T., Schoemaker, N. J.

  12. Close human presence reduces avoidance behaviour in commercial caged laying hens to an approaching human

    Contributor(s):: Edwards, L. E., Coleman, G. J., Hemsworth, P. H.

    The quality of human contact that hens are exposed to will determine the degree of fear of humans that they experience. This has consequences for the welfare of commercial laying hens, as hens that are afraid of humans will be regularly exposed to a fear-provoking stressor. Hens can be habituated...

  13. Hormonal stress response of laboratory mice to conventional and minimally invasive bleeding techniques

    Contributor(s):: Voigt, C. C., Klockner, P., Touma, C., Neuschl, C., Brockmann, G., Goritz, F., Palme, R., Thomsen, R.

  14. Individual and environmental factors associated with stereotypic behavior and fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels in zoo housed polar bears

    Contributor(s):: Shepherdson, D., Lewis, K. D., Carlstead, K., Bauman, J., Perrin, N.

  15. Playful handling as social enrichment for individually- and group-housed laboratory rats

    Contributor(s):: Cloutier, S., Baker, C., Wahl, K., Panksepp, J., Newberry, R. C.

  16. Environmental enrichment exerts anxiolytic effects in the Indian field mouse (Mus booduga)

    Contributor(s):: Varman, D. R., Ganapathy, Marimuthu, Rajan, K. E.

  17. Is the mechanisation of catching broilers a welfare improvement?

    Contributor(s):: Delezie, E., Lips, D., Lips, R., Decuypere, E.

  18. Monitoring stress hormone metabolites as a useful, non-invasive tool for welfare assessment in farm animals

    Contributor(s):: Palme, R.

  19. The effects of individual housing on mice and rats: a review

    Contributor(s):: Krohn, T. C., Sorensen, D. B., Ottesen, J. L., Hansen, A. K.

  20. Human-animal interactions and animal welfare in conventionally and pen-housed rats

    Contributor(s):: Augustsson, H., Lindberg, L., Hoglund, A. U., Dahlborn, K.

    The main aim of the present study was to explore the significance of large group/greater pen housing (PH) versus standard Makrolon caging (ST) in three behaviour tests related to human-animal interactions in the adult male laboratory rat. The rats' perception of human interaction was tested in...