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  1. Which measures of acceleration best estimate the duration of locomotor play by dairy calves?

    Contributor(s):: Luu, John, Johnsen, Julie Føske, Passillé, Anne Marie de, Rushen, Jeffrey

    Measures of acceleration have been used as automated measures of the locomotor play of calves. We examined which measures of acceleration were best correlated with locomotor play and how the sampling rate of the accelerometer affected the correlations. Accelerometers were attached to 30 6–7...

  2. Suckling, weaning, and the development of oral behaviours in dairy calves

    Contributor(s):: Veissier, Isabelle, Caré, Sara, Pomiès, Dominique

    Dairy calves are generally separated from their dam at birth. They express non-nutritive oral activities such as licking or sucking other calves or objects, nibbling, or tongue-playing, which have been related to the absence of sucking a teat and ingestive chewing. We hypothesized that the dam,...

  3. Play behavior as an indicator of animal welfare: Disbudding in dairy calves

    Contributor(s):: Mintline, Erin M., Stewart, Mairi, Rogers, Andrea R., Cox, Neil R., Verkerk, Gwyneth A., Stookey, Joseph M., Webster, James R., Tucker, Cassandra B.

    Play behavior may be reduced during negative experiences (e.g. pain) and serve as an indicator of animal welfare. To test this, the effects of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and a local anesthetic (LA) on dairy calf play behavior and wound sensitivity of calves after hot-iron...

  4. Dairy calves’ adaptation to group housing with automated feeders

    Contributor(s):: Fujiwara, Mayumi, Rushen, Jeffrey, de Passillé, Anne Marie

    Group housing of dairy calves with automated milk feeders has likely welfare and labour saving advantages but delays in the calves adapting to the feeding system may reduce these advantages. We examined factors that influence calves’ adaptation to the feeders. In Exp. 1, 77 Holstein calves were...

  5. The level of social contact affects social behaviour in pre-weaned dairy calves

    Contributor(s):: Duve, Linda Rosager, Jensen, Margit Bak

    The present study investigated the effects of the level of social contact in the home environment on the social preference, bonding and social behaviour of pre-weaned dairy calves. Twenty-seven pairs of calves were reared from birth until 6 weeks either individually (with limited social contact...

  6. Cross-sucking by dairy calves may become a habit or reflect characteristics of individual calves more than milk allowance or weaning

    Contributor(s):: de Passillé, Anne Marie, Borderas, Fernando, Rushen, Jeffrey

    To examine the effects of milk allowance and weaning age on cross-sucking, 45 dairy calves were housed in groups of nine and fed milk and grain-based starter feed from automated feeders and allocated to three treatment groups: (A) Low-Milk Early-Weaned (fed 6L/d of milk until weaned at 47 d of...

  7. Automated measurement of acceleration can detect effects of age, dehorning and weaning on locomotor play of calves

    Contributor(s):: Rushen, Jeffrey, de Passillé, Anne Marie

    Play may be a behavioural indicator of positive emotions in young animals, but in calves spontaneous play is time consuming to record. We examined whether measures of acceleration of calves in a large enclosure could detect effects on play running of age, dehorning and weaning off milk. Holstein...

  8. Herd-level associations between human-animal relationship, management, fecal cortisol metabolites, and udder health of organic dairy cows

    Contributor(s):: Ivemeyer, S., Simantke, C., Ebinghaus, A., Poulsen, P. H., Sorensen, J. T., Rousing, T., Palme, R., Knierim, U.

  9. Contact with cows during the young age increases social competence and lowers the cardiac stress reaction in dairy calves

    Contributor(s):: Buchli, Cornelia, Raselli, Alice, Bruckmaier, Rupert, Hillmann, Edna

    Separating calf and cow within 24h after birth is common practice in dairy farms. Some dairy farmers, however, practice a rearing system in which the calves are nursed by their dam or by foster cows. We investigated if dairy calves reared in such a system (calves with cow-contact) differ in their...

  10. The effect of feeding enrichment in the milk-feeding stage on the cognition of dairy calves in a T-maze

    Contributor(s):: Horvath, Kelsey, Fernandez, Mariana, Miller-Cushon, Emily K.

    In many species, environmental complexity is known to affect cognitive development, yet it is common to house dairy calves individually in restrictive environments. The hypothesis of this study was that providing calves with simple nutritional enrichments would improve their success in a...

  11. Is rearing calves with the dam a feasible option for dairy farms?—Current and future research

    Contributor(s):: Johnsen, Julie Føske, Zipp, Katharina A., Kälber, Tasja, Passillé, Anne Marie de, Knierim, Ute, Barth, Kerstin, Mejdell, Cecilie Marie

    In the dairy industry it is common practice to separate cow and calf shortly after birth but this practice is disputed because of animal welfare concerns. Some producers, in many countries, milk cows that also nurse dairy calves. These cow–calf systems allow nursing as well as affiliative and...

  12. On-farm factors associated with cross-sucking in group-housed organic Simmental dairy calves

    Contributor(s):: Größbacher, Verena, Winckler, Christoph, Leeb, Christine

    In EU organic dairy farming, group housing of calves is required after the first week. Especially in Simmental herds, this is perceived as a risk factor for cross-sucking (CS), i.e. sucking the udder-region or the scrotal area or any other body part of another calf, which may reflect frustrated...

  13. Technology and restructuring the social field of dairy farming: hybrid capitals, 'stockmanship' and Automatic Milking Systems

    Contributor(s):: Butler, D., Holloway, L.

    Using Automatic Milking Systems (AMS) as an example we use the work of Bourdieu to illustrate how technology can be seen as restructuring dairy farming practices, what it is to be a dairy farmer, and the wider field of dairy farming. Approaching technology in this way and drawing upon the...

  14. Human-animal interaction: productive impact on the dairy herd. CommunicationInteraccion humano-animal: impacto productivo en rodeos lecheros. Comunicacion

    Contributor(s):: Martinez, G. M., Suarez, V. H., Bertoni, E. A.

  15. Positive and negative gestational handling influences placental traits and mother-offspring behavior in dairy goats

    Contributor(s):: Baxter, E. M., Mulligan, J., Hall, S. A., Donbavand, J. E., Palme, R., Aldujaili, E., Zanella, A. J., Dwyer, C. M.

    Dairy animals are subjected to a number of potential stressors throughout their lives, including daily interactions with humans. The quality of these interactions may have direct consequences for the animal undergoing the experience, but if such events occur during gestation it may also affect...

  16. A prospective exploration of farm, farmer, and animal characteristics in human-animal relationships: an epidemiological survey

    Contributor(s):: Roches, A. de B. des, Veissier, I., Boivin, X., Gilot-Fromont, E., Mounier, L.

    Human-animal relationships are essential for dairy farming. They affect work comfort and efficiency, as well as milk production. A poor human-animal relationship can result in stress and accidents to both animals and caretakers and needs to be improved. However, many studies have demonstrated the...

  17. Human-animal interactions and safety during dairy cattle handling - comparing moving cows to milking and hoof trimming

    Contributor(s):: Lindahl, C., Pinzke, S., Herlin, A., Keeling, L. J.

    Cattle handling is a dangerous activity on dairy farms, and cows are a major cause of injuries to livestock handlers. Even if dairy cows are generally tranquil and docile, when situations occur that they perceive or remember as aversive, they may become agitated and hazardous to handle. This...

  18. Identification and development of measures suitable as potential breeding traits regarding dairy cows' reactivity towards humans

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Ebinghaus, A., Ivemeyer, S., Rupp, J., Knierim, U.

    Behavioural indicators of the human-animal relationship (HAR) are predominantly used in animal welfare science. However, the reactivity of dairy cows - as part of the HAR - is also of interest in the context of dairy breeding, due to its estimated moderate heritability. The avoidance distance...

  19. Influences on the avoidance and approach behaviour of dairy goats towards an unfamiliar human - an on-farm study

    | Contributor(s):: Mersmann, D., Schmied-Wagner, C., Nordmann, E., Graml, C., Waiblinger, S.

    The human-animal relationship (HAR) is an important factor for successful animal husbandry and animal welfare. Thus, the HAR is included in on-farm assessments to evaluate overall welfare. For dairy goats, validated tests to assess the HAR are lacking. The aim of the present study was to evaluate...

  20. Jun 01 2017

    2nd Annual Dairy Cattle Welfare Symposium: Milwaukee, Wisconsin

    The Dairy Cattle Welfare Symposium will bring together industry leaders to discuss best recommended practices of dairy cattle welfare and their implementation with focus on public relations,...

    https://habricentral.org/events/details/561