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  1. Conservation and Hunting: Till Death Do They Part? A Legal Ethnography of Deer Management

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Irus Braverman

    Claims that hunters are exemplar conservationists would likely come as a surprise to many. Hunters, after all, kill animals. Isn’t there a better way to appreciate wildlife than to kill and consume it? Yet there is no mistake: wildlife managers frequently make the claim that hunters, in...

  2. The use of GPS data to identify calving behaviour of farmed red deer hinds: Proof of concept for intensively managed hinds

    | Contributor(s):: Asher, G. W., Wall, A. J., O’Neill, K. T., Littlejohn, R. P., Bryant, A., Cox, N.

    This study investigated the utility of GPS data for assigning individual calving dates and times for red deer hinds based on already known generalised movement patterns around parturition. Nineteen hinds expected to calve in early November were fitted with GPS neck collars two weeks before...

  3. Chlamydia pecorum Associated With an Outbreak of Infectious Keratoconjunctivitis in Semi-domesticated Reindeer in Sweden

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Javier Sánchez Romano, Mikael Leijon, Åsa Hagström, Tomas Jinnerot, Ulrika K. Rockström, Morten Tryland

    Infectious keratoconjunctivitis (IKC), the most common ocular disease in ruminants worldwide, has affected semi-domesticated Eurasian reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) for over 100 years, both as individual cases and in outbreaks affecting tens to hundreds of animals. Recurrent IKC...

  4. Use of the Human Vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette Guérin in Deer

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Mitchell V. Palmer, Tyler C. Thacker

    The only vaccine ever approved for human tuberculosis was developed a century ago from an isolate of Mycobacterium bovis derived from a tuberculous cow. Initial safety and efficacy studies of an attenuated version of this isolate were conducted in cattle and other animals. In 1921 the first...

  5. Reindeer spatial use before, during and after construction of a wind farm

    | Contributor(s):: Tsegaye, Diress, Colman, Jonathan E., Eftestøl, Sindre, Flydal, Kjetil, Røthe, Gunnlaug, Rapp, Kåre

    The Fakken Wind farm (WF) was built in 2010–12 on the Fakken peninsula on the south-east corner of the island of Vannøy. Field and GPS sampling was conducted to test the interaction between reindeer spatial use and the WF with associated infrastructure for the period 2007–2015. “Before data” for...

  6. Do human activity and infrastructure disturb domesticated reindeer? The need for the reindeer's perspective

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Anna Skarin, Birgitta Åhman

    In recent decades, human–Rangifer (reindeer and caribou) interactions have increasingly been studied from a scientific perspective. Many of the studies have examined Norwegian wild reindeer or caribou in North America. It is often questioned whether results from these studies can be...

  7. Jaguar and puma captivity and trade among the Maya: Stable isotope data from Copan, Honduras

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Nawa Sugiyama, William L. Fash, Christine A.M. France

    From Moctezuma’s zoo to animals kept in captivity at Teotihuacan, there is increasing evidence that Mesoamericans managed wild animals for a myriad of purposes. The present study situates ritualized animal management of highly symbolic fauna in the broader context of Classic Mesoamerica...

  8. The Truth about Deer, Turtles, and Dogs: An examination of Ancient Maya Human-Faunal Interactions

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Lindsay Foreman

  9. Deer and identity in medieval Ireland

    | Contributor(s):: Fiona Beglane

    The concept that identity is inextricably linked with places, landscapes and objects has become familiar in archaeology (Thomas 1998, 80, 90; Bradley 2000, 155-61; O'Keeffe 2001). It is only recently however that this idea has been extended to animals and their interaction with human society...

  10. Circumpolarity : Human-Animal Relationships in the Circumpolar North

    | Contributor(s):: David George Anderson

    This five-year project investigates how people and animals today, and in the past, build sustainable communities around the circumpolar Arctic.

  11. Příroda a kultura u malých sibiřských národů

    | Contributor(s):: Martina Nováková

    Cílem předkládané práce je jednak v obecné rovině představit téma přírody a kultury v perspektivě sociální a kulturní antropologie a jednak zachytit tuto problematiku v konkrétním prostředí...

  12. Runne-Beana: dog herds ethnographer

    | Contributor(s):: Anderson, M.

    Saami society in Lapland (now often called Saapmi), particularly the seasonally-nomadic reindeer-breeding sector, is predicated upon mobility and autonomy of its actors. Runne-Beana, a talented reindeer-herding dog, exhibited both mobility and autonomy when allocating to himself a peripatetic...

  13. Personhood and companionship among Evenki and their reindeer in Eastern Siberia

    | Contributor(s):: Evelyn Landerer

    This thesis aims to contribute to our understanding of human-reindeer relations among nomadic hunters and reindeer keepers and is based on a discussion of manifestations of personhood in Siberia. I then relate these to contemporary theories in human-animal relations and argue that in the case of...

  14. Hunters' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice towards Wildlife Disease in Ohio

    | Contributor(s):: Pallavi Oruganti

     Ethnographic research is critical to understanding the human dimensions of wildlife diseases and management, as it allows us to understand the potential social contributors of disease transmission in specific populations. Hunters play a significant role in the ecology of wildlife disease...

  15. Depredatory impact of free-roaming dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) on Mediterranean deer in southern Spain: implications for the human-wolf conflict.

    | Contributor(s):: J. Duarte, F.J. Garcia, JE Fa

    Feral dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) are efficient wild ungulate hunters in many parts of the world. This has not been confirmed in Mediterranean ecosystems. However, if feral dogs can predate upon wild Mediterranean ungulates, they can also do so upon livestock. Therefore, to more realistically...

  16. The potential for commercial deer farming in New Zealand

    | Contributor(s):: Michael P. McIntyre

    New Zealand's wild deer herds are sizable and free for the taking, but given this response to the opportunity for free enterprise profits by commercial hunters, and with the realization that bigger markets than that of West Germany might well be opened up, government planners are beginning to...

  17. Attitudes Toward and Perceptions of Deer Management in Suburban Boston

    | Contributor(s):: Michael Devito

    Communities in the United States have experienced a large and growing white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) population. Residents in these communities may enjoy encounters with white-tailed deer, but they also perceive problems with deer such as car collisions, garden damage, and Lyme...

  18. Prehistoric reindeer hunting in the southern Norwegian highlands

    | Contributor(s):: Sveinung Bang-Andersen

    In contrast to the European alpine areas and lowland plains, where Rangifer tarandus L. became extinct during the final Late Glacial, the species has survived in a wild state in relatively unchanged natural environments in parts of the southern Norwegian highlands. As a consequence, reindeer...

  19. Hunting Bambi : evaluating the basis for selective harvesting of juveniles

    | Contributor(s):: Jos M. Milner, Christophe Bonefant, Atle Mysterud

    Human harvesting is often a major mortality factor and, hence, an important proximate factor driving the population dynamics of large mammals. Several selective harvesting regimes focus on removing animals with low reproductive value, such as “antlered” harvests in North America and...

  20. Effect of mountain biking on red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Kaupanger, Norway

    | Contributor(s):: Janneke Scholten

    Human outdoor activities, like mountain biking, often affect animal behaviour. Ungulates might avoid roads and trails, and increase their avoidance with increasing human activity. Recently, biking on forest trails has increased considerably in Norway, but we still have limited knowledge about how...