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Resources (1-20 of 560)

  1. Standards for the academic veterinary medical library

    Contributor(s):: Sarah Anne Murphy, Martha A. Bedard, Jill Crawley-Low, Diane Fagen, Jean-Paul Jetté

    The Standards Committee of the Veterinary Medical Libraries Section was appointed in May 2000 and charged to create standards for the ideal academic veterinary medical library, written from the perspective of veterinary medical librarians. The resulting Standards for the Academic Veterinary...

  2. Domestic rabbits: diseases and parasites

    Contributor(s):: Nephi M. Patton, K.W. Hagen, J.R. Gorham, Ronald E. Flatt

    Designed to help ranchers recognize common rabbit diseases. Diseases are classified according to major cause-bacterial, viral, nutritional, hereditary, fungal, and miscellaneous (including poisoning, tumors, and vices). For each disease, the symptoms and treatment are described. Provides advice...

  3. Animal Rabies, Maine-2012

  4. Zoonoses: Animal to human diseases

    Contributor(s):: E. Fevre, D. Grace

    This resource is a media briefing regarding the control of zoonotic diseases, the Bird Flu outbreak in China, and the connection between urban agriculture and human health.

  5. ILRI scientists put livestock squarely on the (human) health table

    Contributor(s):: D. Grace, J. McDermott

    This report is a think piece that discusses veterniary scientist Delia Grace and veterinary researcher John McDermott and their work with the connection between livestock and human health.

  6. Agriculture-associated diseases research at ILRI: Neglected zoonoses

    Contributor(s):: E. Fèvre, D. Grace

    Neglected zoonoses thrive in neglected populations and impose burdens on both health and livelihoods. Integrated “One Health” approaches offer new promise in tackling these old diseases.