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  1. Assessment of Attachment Behavior to Human Caregivers in Wolf Pups (Canis lupus lupus)

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Nathaniel J. Hall, Kathryn Lord, Anne-­‐Marie K. Arnold, Clive D.L. Wynne, Monique A.R. Udell

    Previous research suggested that 16-­‐week old dog pups, but not wolf pups, show attachment behaviour to a human caregiver. Attachment to a caregiver in dog pups has been demonstrated by differential responding to a caregiver compared to a stranger in the Ainsworth Strange...

  2. Wild Meets Domestic in the Near Eastern Neolithic

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Russell, N.

    The categories of wild and domestic are one of the classic ways the nature/culture dichotomy manifests itself in human interactions with the environment. Some argue that this distinction is not helpful and a projection of modern thought, and certainly the boundaries are complicated. However, we...

  3. The Role of Socialisation in the Taming and Management of Wild Dingoes by Australian Aboriginal People

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Brumm, Adam, Koungoulos, Loukas

    Historical sources and Indigenous oral traditions indicate that Australian Aboriginal people commonly reared and kept the wild-caught pups of dingoes (C. dingo) as tamed companion animals. A review of the available evidence suggests Indigenous communities employed an intense socialisation...

  4. Cooperative Communication with Humans Evolved to Emerge Early in Domestic Dogs

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Hannah Salomons, Kyle C.M. Smith, Megan Callahan-Beckel, Margaret Callahan, Kerinne Levy, Brenda S. Kennedy, Emily E. Bray, Gitanjali E. Gnanadesikan, Daniel J. Horschler, Margaret Gruen, Jingzhi Tan, Philip White, Bridgett M. vonHoldt, Evan L. MacLean, Brian Hare

    Although we know that dogs evolved from wolves, it remains unclear how domestication affected dog cognition. One hypothesis suggests dog domestication altered social maturation by a process of selecting for an attraction to humans.1,  2,  3 Under this account, dogs became more...

  5. Did Eating Human Poop Play a Role in the Evolution of Dogs?

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Harold Herzog

  6. Maladaptation in feral and domesticated animals

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Eben Gering, Darren Incorvaia, Rie Henriksen, Dominic Wright, Thomas Getty

    Selection regimes and population structures can be powerfully changed by domestication and feralization, and these changes can modulate animal fitness in both captive and natural environments. In this review, we synthesize recent studies of these two processes and consider their impacts on...

  7. Historical development of horse breeds

    | Contributor(s):: Tuncer, S. S., Kozat, S.

    This study was conducted to examine the historical development process of modern horse breeds. Horses are among the few species that have managed to become domesticated on earth. The domestication of horses took place after dogs, goats, sheep, pigs, reindeer and poultry. It is accepted that the...

  8. Selection for reduced fear of humans changes intra-specific social behavior in red junglefowl - implications for chicken domestication

    | Contributor(s):: Gjoen, J., Jensen, P.

  9. Tracing Economic, Ritual, and Social Pathways to Neolithization in the Southern Levant through Human-Animal Relationships at Kfar HaHoresh

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jacqueline Suzanne Meier

    During the transition to agriculture in the southern Levant of Southwest Asia, the PrePottery Neolithic B (PPNB) period is marked by the beginning of herd animal management, a fluorescence of ritual evidence and increasingly large settlements with diversified uses. These developments had...

  10. The Process of Coming and Going in this World: Conversation About Interspecies Collaboration, Domestication, Sound

    | Contributor(s):: Burke, Ruth K., Landau, Jessica

  11. Ethnographic Observations on the Role of Domestic Dogs in the Lowland Tropics of Belize with Emphasis on Crop Protection and Subsistence Hunting

    | Contributor(s):: Pacheco-Cobos, Luis, Winterhalder, Bruce

  12. No evident effect of domestication on the anti-predator behaviour of European abalone (Haliotis tuberculata): Implications for stock enhancement programs

    | Contributor(s):: Chauvaud, Pierre, Day, Rob, Roussel, Sabine

  13. Global cities, glocal fauna: animals and the urban British Atlantic, 1660–1800

    | Contributor(s):: Wells, Andrew

  14. Why were New World rabbits not domesticated?

    | Contributor(s):: Somerville, A. D., Sugiyama, N.

    2021 Animal Frontiers 11 3 62-68 2160-6056 10.1093/af/vfab026 English Department of World Languages and Cultures, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA.asomervi@iastate.edu text

  15. Origin of the domestic chicken from modern biological and zooarchaeological approaches

    | Contributor(s):: Eda, M.

    2021Animal Frontiers11352-612160-605610.1093/af/vfab016EnglishHokkaido University Museum, Hokkaido University, Kita 10, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo Hokkaido 060-0810, Japan.edamsk@museum.hokudai.ac.jptext

  16. La domesticación de los camélidos andinos como proceso de interacción humana y animal

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Hugo D. Yacobaccio, Bibiana Vilá

    Este trabajo analiza los mecanismos de la domesticación de la llama (Lama glama) a partir de su ancestro silvestre, el guanaco (Lama guanicoe) haciendo hincapié en las etapas que componen el proceso. Analizamos críticamente algunas falacias que comúnmente se han...

  17. Encounters with a canine other: performing domestication in transnational animal rescue and rehoming

    | Contributor(s):: Schuurman, Nora

  18. Le chien : un loup domestiqué pour communiquer avec l'homme : l'agressivité du chien

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Jean-Marie Giffroy

    Il est établi, sur la base des recherches en archéozoologie et en génétique moléculaire, que le loup serait le principal ancêtre du chien et que la domestication se serait produite il y a 14000 ou 15000 ans, soit 5000 ans avant la domestication d'une...

  19. The relationship between functional breed selection and attachment pattern in family dogs (canis familiaris)

    | Contributor(s):: Lenkei, Rita, Carreiro, Cecília, Gácsi, Márta, Pongrácz, Péter

    2021Applied Animal Behaviour Science2351052310168-159110.1016/j.applanim.2021.105231text

  20. Our Wild Companions: Domestic cats in the Anthropocene

    | Contributor(s):: Crowley, S. L., Cecchetti, M., McDonald, R. A.