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  1. A 'long-fuse domestication' of the horse? Tooth shape suggests explosive change in modern breeds compared to extinct populations and living Przewalski horses

    Contributor(s):: Krish Seetah, Andrea Cardini, Graeme Barker

    Archaeological and molecular data suggest that horses were domesticated comparatively recently, the genetic evidence indicating that this was from several maternal haplotypes but only a single paternal one. However, although central to our understanding of how humans and environmental conditions...

  2. Living with the beast: wolves and humans through Portuguese literature

    Contributor(s):: Lopes-Fernandes, M., Soares, F., Frazao-Moreira, A., Queiroz, A. I.

    This paper explores representations of wolves in Portuguese literature using an anthropological framework to analyze perceptions, beliefs, knowledge, and practices. From a literary corpus compilation, 262 excerpts from 68 works that made reference to wolves were classified by grid analysis into...

  3. Neurobiological underpinnings of dogs’ human-like social competence: How interactions between stress response systems and oxytocin mediate dogs’ social skills

    Contributor(s):: Buttner, Alicia Phillips

  4. How has the domestication of dogs impacted native North American culture and way of life?

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: Mikaela E. Reisman

    Dogs, as the only domestic mammal in North America, were a part of the life and culture of the people who migrated to the Americas from Eurasia. Originally domesticated from Eurasian wolves, the uses of dogs expanded once the Native American ancestors spread throughout the continents. I...

  5. Social behavior of domestic dogs and cats as compared to wild canine and feline species : an honors thesis

    Contributor(s):: Anthony W. Rusk

    With the help of animal behavioralists, parallels have been drawn between domestic dogs and cats and their wild cousins. In some respects, social behavior in domestic animals has remained similar to characteristics found in wild animals. General observations of social conduct have been examined....

  6. Documenting Domestication: New Genetic Archaeological Paradigms

    Contributor(s):: Melinda A. Zeder

    Dr. Melinda Zeder, Director of Archaeobiology Program at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History delivers a talk at The Ohio State University (125 Scott Lab) about DNA and domestication. Dr. Zeder's lecture is part of a project sponsored by the Battelle Endowment...

  7. Determining the antiquity of dog origins: canine domestication as a model for the consilience between molecular genetics and archaeology

    Contributor(s):: Michelle Jeanette Raisor

    Archaeologists have favored a date of 14,000-15,000 years before present (BP) for canine domestication. However, recent studies of mutations in the mitochondrial DNA sequence by molecular geneticists have implied that dogs were domesticated over 100,000 years ago, which has challenged traditional...

  8. Accommodating the Animal: Domestication in Eighteenth-Century English Literature

    Contributor(s):: Erin Parker

    Eighteenth-century English writers imagined domestication as the education of animals, as a mutually beneficial contract between species, as a form of cruelty and exploitation, and as an extension of hospitality. This study analyses how these diverse literary portrayals of domestication intersect...

  9. Animal domestication and vertebrate speciation : a paradigm for the origin of species

    Contributor(s):: Susan Janet Crockford

    Heterochrony (changes in developmental rates and/or timing) has been successfully argued as the most significant process in evolution. Heterochronic differences between species are recognized in many vertebrate lineages, including hominids and domesticates. However, the biological mechanism(s)...

  10. Living with the beast: wolves and humans through Portuguese literature

    Contributor(s):: Lopes-Fernandes, M., Soares, F., Frazao-Moreira, A., Queiroz, A. I.

    This paper explores representations of wolves in Portuguese literature using an anthropological framework to analyze perceptions, beliefs, knowledge, and practices. From a literary corpus compilation, 262 excerpts from 68 works that made reference to wolves were classified by grid analysis into...

  11. The pact for survival : humans and their animal companions

    Contributor(s):: Newby, Jonica

  12. Animal welfare aspects in cat ownershipTierschutzrelevante Aspekte bei der Katzenhaltung

    Contributor(s):: Hoefer, M.

    A review on the policies, welfare issues, and law on cat ownership in Germany was presented.

  13. Early domestication and farming: what should we know or do for a better understanding?

    Contributor(s):: Vigne, J. D.

    This paper aims to identify a series of conceptual, strategic and technological challenges facing archaeozoology (and archaeobotany) in order to better understand when, where, how and why plant and animal domestication and farming developed during the last 12 000 years. Situated at the interface...

  14. Animal Welfare in Human-Animal Interactions

    Full-text: Available

    Contributor(s):: Myrna Milani

    Just as what comprises acceptable welfare in any people involved in human-animal interactions (HAI) represents an amalgam of multiple components that related to multiple disciplines, what comprises the welfare of the animals involved in these same interactions is...

  15. Watercraft, People, and Animals: Setting the Stage for the Neolithic Colonization of the Mediterranean Islands of Cyprus and Crete

    Contributor(s):: Katelyn Dibenedetto

    One of the most significant developments in human history was the “Neolithic Revolution,” which first began around 11,000 years ago in mainland Southwest Asia. It resulted in not only the economic reorientation from hunting and foraging to herding and farming based on domesticate...

  16. Evolution. Dogs hijack the human bonding pathway

    Contributor(s):: MacLean, E. L., Hare, B.

  17. Social evolution. Oxytocin-gaze positive loop and the coevolution of human-dog bonds

    Contributor(s):: Nagasawa, M., Mitsui, S., En, S., Ohtani, N., Ohta, M., Sakuma, Y., Onaka, T., Mogi, K., Kikusui, T.

  18. Interpersonal barriers to stopping animal abuse: exploring the role of adolescent friendship norms and breeches

    Contributor(s):: Arluke, A.

  19. Variation and Plasticity in Equid Behavior: Coevolution and Domestication

    Contributor(s):: Brubaker, Alexali Sienna

  20. Comparative Analysis of the Domestic Cat Genome Reveals Genetic Signatures Underlying Feline Biology and Domestication

    Contributor(s):: Michael J. Montague, Gang Li, Barbara Gandolfi, Razib Khan, Brownwen L. Aken, Steven M. J. Searle, Patrick Minx, Ladeana W. Hillier, Daniel C. Koboldt, Brian W. Davis, Carlos A. Driscoll, Christina S. Barr, Kevin Blackistone, Javier Quilez, Belen Lorente-Galdos, Tomas Marques-Bonet, Can Alkan, Gregg W.C. Thomas, Matthew W. Hahn, Marilyn Menotti-Raymond, Stephen J. O\'Brien, Richard K. Wilson, Leslie A. Lyons, William J. Murphy, Wesley C. Warren

    Little is known about the genetic changes that distinguish domestic cat populations from their wild progenitors. Here we describe a high-quality domestic cat reference genome assembly and comparative inferences made with other cat breeds, wildcats, and other mammals. Based upon these comparisons,...