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  1. Problems concerning the ethical justification of the equestrian use of the horse

    Contributor(s):: Meyer, Heinz

  2. Female horses are more socially dependent than geldings kept in riding clubs

    Contributor(s):: Górecka-Bruzda, Aleksandra, Jastrzębska, Ewa, Drewka, Magdalena, Nadolna, Zuzanna, Becker, Katarzyna, Lansade, Lea

  3. Exploring Perceptions of Equine Welfare Scenarios Using a Positive Approach

    Contributor(s):: Lofgren, Elise A., Rice, Brandon M. G., Brady, Colleen M.

  4. Equine Activities Influence Horses' Responses to Different Stimuli: Could This Have an Impact on Equine Welfare?

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Tiago Mendonça, Cécile Bienboire-Frosini, Izabela Kowalczyk, Julien Leclercq, Sana Arroub, Patrick Pageat

    The learning and cognitive challenges that horses may face differ according to the activities in which they are involved. The aim of this investigation was to study the influence of equine activities on the behavioral responses and autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity of adult horses....

  5. Rider effects on horses’ conflict behaviour, rein tension, physiological measures and rideability scores

    | Contributor(s):: Christensen, Janne Winther, Munk, Rikke, Hawson, Lesley, Palme, Rupert, Larsen, Torben, Egenvall, Agneta, König von Borstel, Uta U., Rørvang, Maria Vilain

  6. Understanding and Application of Learning Theory in UK-based Equestrians

    | Contributor(s):: Brown, Sarah M., Connor, Melanie

    Learning in equines occurs through a predictable chain of stimulus–response–consequence processing. Whether the behavior persists will depend on the nature and timing of the consequence, whether it punishes or reinforces the response behavior. Knowledge and application of learning theory in...

  7. Equipment and training risk factors associated with ridden behaviour problems in UK leisure horses

    | Contributor(s):: Hockenhull, Jo, Creighton, Emma

    Ridden behaviour problems are prevalent in the UK leisure horse population and may have implications for horse welfare and rider safety. This study aimed to identify risk factors associated with ridden behaviour problems in UK leisure horses from the training approaches and equipment used with...

  8. Equine performance and equitation science: Clinical issues

    | Contributor(s):: Dyson, Sue

    The quality of equine performance can be influenced by pain, whether or not that results in overt lameness. Recognition of low-grade lameness is challenging, but with careful observation there are many clues which veterinarians, riders and trainers should recognise. Riders and trainers are...

  9. Rider impacts on equitation

    | Contributor(s):: Williams, Jane, Tabor, Gillian

    Equestrianism is popular worldwide, with millions of horses and riders participating in competitive horse sports and non-competitive leisure riding. Riders have a duty of care or responsibility for their horses and should aim to optimise their health and welfare. Despite this, limited research...

  10. The use of the technology in equitation science: A panacea or abductive science?

    | Contributor(s):: Randle, Hayley, Steenbergen, Menke, Roberts, Kirsty, Hemmings, Andrew

    Equitation encompasses a range of activities in which horses interact closely with humans. The need to ensure both horse management and equitation practice is ethical and sustainable is becoming emphasized globally. Robust and rigorous measurement is critical to objective assessment of practice....

  11. Applied neurophysiology of the horse; implications for training, husbandry and welfare

    | Contributor(s):: McBride, Sebastian D., Parker, Matthew O., Roberts, Kirsty, Hemmings, Andrew

    Understanding the neural circuits underlying equine behaviour has the potential to help optimise strategies of husbandry and training. This review discusses two areas of neurophysiological research in a range of species and relates this information to the horse. The first discussion focuses on...

  12. The role of the ethogram in equitation science

    | Contributor(s):: Hall, Carol, Heleski, Camie

    The development of a comprehensive ethogram that could be used to record the behaviour of the ridden horse in a range of different scenarios would provide a valuable resource for researchers within equitation science. However, the relevance of the behaviours included in such an ethogram and...

  13. The importance of learning theory and equitation science to the veterinarian

    | Contributor(s):: Doherty, Orla, McGreevy, Paul D., Pearson, Gemma

    The work of veterinarians when handling horses exposes them to high risk of injury. Among equine practitioners, the incidences of work-related injuries and work days lost due to injury are high. Equine veterinary practitioners’ knowledge of learning theory and equitation science is minimal....

  14. The role of biomechanical analysis of horse and rider in equitation science

    | Contributor(s):: Clayton, Hilary M., Hobbs, Sarah-Jane

    Equestrian sports are unique in that they involve the participation of two athletes that differ greatly in morphology yet are able to move together harmoniously; experienced riders not only move in phase with the horse, they can even improve the consistency of the horse’s movements. The motion of...

  15. Using the Five Domains Model to Assess the Adverse Impacts of Husbandry, Veterinary, and Equitation Interventions on Horse Welfare

    Full-text: Available

    | Contributor(s):: Paul McGreevy, Jeannine Berger, Nic de Brauwere, Orla Doherty, Anna Harrison, Julie Fielder, Claudia Jones, Sue McDonnell, Andrew McLean, Lindsay Nakonechny, Christine Nicol, Liane Preshaw, Peter Thomson, Vicky Tzioumis, John Webster, Sarah Wolfensohn, James Yeates, Bidda Jones

    The aim of this study was to conduct a series of paper-based exercises in order to assess the negative (adverse) welfare impacts, if any, of common interventions on domestic horses across a broad range of different contexts of equine care and training. An international panel (with professional...

  16. The Contribution of Equitation Science to Minimising Horse-Related Risks to Humans

    | Contributor(s):: Melissa Starling, Andrew McLean, Paul McGreevy

    Equitation science is an evidence-based approach to horse training and riding that focuses on a thorough understanding of both equine ethology and learning theory. This combination leads to more effective horse training, but also plays a role in keeping horse riders and trainers safe around...

  17. Equitation science. (Special Issue)

    | Contributor(s):: Goodwin, D., McGreevy, P. D., Heleski, C., Randle, H., Waran, N.

    Discusses various reports published within the issue including one on learned helplessness by Carol Hall and another on the use of additional positive reinforcement in improving learning to across an aversive ground surface.