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  1. Mandatory Pet Sterilization and Overpopulation: Have Santa Cruz County's Policies Reduced Animal Shelter Intake and Euthanasia

    Contributor(s):: Amy Winkleblack

  2. Kimberly

    https://habricentral.org/members/2686

  3. Killing the enviropigs

    Contributor(s):: Clark, J. L.

    In spring 2012, after losing the main source of funding for its Enviropig project, the University of Guelph killed its last remaining Enviropigs. Or, as a university spokesperson put it, the pigs were "humanely euthanized." Through an engagement with this particular case, I examine the ethical...

  4. Animal facilitated therapy, overview and future direction

    Contributor(s):: McCulloch, M. J.

    Article from a special issue on Human--companion animal bond

  5. Euthanasia of pets: strengthening end-of-life care

    Contributor(s):: O'Dair, H.

    Practices often have procedures in place to educate and bond clients when they first visit with young animals, but the significance of having similar policies during pets' end-of-life care can be overlooked. Hilary O'Dair discusses how support services can help grieving owners and veterinary...

  6. Rat aversion to sevoflurane and isoflurane

    Contributor(s):: Bertolus, J. B., Nemeth, G., Makowska, I. J., Weary, D. M.

    Virtually all rodents used in research are eventually euthanized. Best practice is to anaesthetize these animals before euthanasia using a halogenated anaesthetic such as isoflurane. Exposure to isoflurane is aversive, but less so than exposure to the commonly used carbon dioxide. Sevoflurane is...

  7. Testing three measures of mouse insensibility following induction with isoflurane or carbon dioxide gas for a more humane euthanasia

    Contributor(s):: Moody, C. M., Makowska, I. J., Weary, D. M.

    Laboratory mice are commonly killed via exposure to gradually increasing concentrations of isoflurane and carbon dioxide (CO 2) gas. Once rendered insensible using isoflurane or CO 2, a high concentration of CO 2 is used to decrease time to death. When the switch from isoflurane to a high flow...

  8. Shelters and pet overpopulation: a statistical black hole

    Contributor(s):: Rowan, A. N.

    "Over the past 20 years, the animal sheltercommunity in the United States has beengrappling with the problem of millions ofunwanted dogs and cats." Lack of statistical data makes it difficult "to evaluate progressin dealing with pet overpopulation" during that time frame.

  9. Value conflicts in feral cat management: trap-neuter-return or trap-euthanize?

    Contributor(s):: Palmer, C., Appleby, M. C., Weary, D. M., Sandoe, P.

    This chapter explores the key values at stake in feral cat management, focusing on the debate over whether to use trap-neuter-return or trap-euthanize as management tools for cat populations. The chapter provides empirical background on unowned cats, sketches widely-used arguments in favour of...

  10. Evaluation of microwave energy as a humane stunning technique based on electroencephalography (EEG) of anaesthetised cattle

    Contributor(s):: Rault, J. L., Hemsworth, P. H., Cakebread, P. L., Mellor, D. J., Johnson, C. B.

    Humane slaughter implies that an animal experiences minimal pain and distress before it is killed. Stunning is commonly used to induce insensibility but can lead to variable results or be considered unsatisfactory by some religious groups. Microwave energy can induce insensibility in rats, and...

  11. Is there a bias against stray cats in shelters? People's perception of shelter cats and how it influences adoption time

    Contributor(s):: Dybdall, K., Strasser, R.

    The determination of adoptability is a fundamental issue facing shelters wishing to rehome cats. Many shelters in the United States cannot keep a cat indefinitely and increased time in the shelter environment may lead to reduced animal welfare due to chronic stress or euthanasia. In a series of...

  12. Hospice in a zoologic medicine setting.

    Contributor(s):: Jessup, David A., Scott, Cheryl A.

  13. A comparison of attachment levels of adopters of cats: fee-based adoptions versus free adoptions

    Contributor(s):: Weiss, E., Gramann, S.

    Nonhuman animal welfare professionals have been critical of adoption programs that do not charge a fee for adult cats, despite the high euthanasia rate for cats due to a reported lack of homes. The argument against the free cat adoptions cites a devaluation of the cat, which may affect the...

  14. Disposition of shelter companion animals from nonhuman animal control officers, citizen finders, and relinquished by caregivers

    Contributor(s):: Notaro, S. J.

    Many private not-for-profit humane societies have contracts with their local government entities to provide nonhuman animal control services that the law commonly requires the government to provide to its residents. These services normally have the humane organization providing either the total...

  15. Employee reactions and adjustment to euthanasia-related work: identifying turning-point events through retrospective narratives

    Contributor(s):: Reeve, C. L., Spitzmuller, C., Rogelberg, S. G., Walker, A., Schultz, L., Clark, O.

    This study used a retrospective narrative procedure to examine the critical events that influence reactions and adjustment to euthanasia-related work of 35 employees who have stayed in the animal care and welfare field for at least 2 years. Data were collected at the 2002 Animal Care Expo held in...

  16. Grief and bereavement of Israeli dog owners: Exploring short-term phases pre- and post-euthanization

    Contributor(s):: Tzivian, Lilian, Friger, Michael, Kushnir, Talma

    Several studies have investigated the grief that owners experience after they euthanized their pets. However, research has not explored the cognitive and emotional processes those dog owners experience. The authors chose an exploratory approach and conducted a content analysis of 29...

  17. Humane killing of nonhuman animals for disease control purposes

    Contributor(s):: Raj, M.

    Reports and guidelines produced by international institutions such as the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE, 2005) describe various methods of killing nonhuman animals. Selection and implementation of a killing method may involve several factors. Preventing or minimizing risk to human...

  18. Impact of a bilingual mobile spay/neuter clinic in a U.S./Mexico border city

    Contributor(s):: Poss, J. E., Everett, M.

    There are between 4 and 10 million dogs and cats killed annually in the United States. Although there are no accurate national estimates of the number of companion animals who are sterilized surgically. Approximately 26,000 companion animals are euthanized annually in El Paso County, Texas,...

  19. Impact of a subsidized spay neuter clinic on impoundments and euthanasia in a community shelter and on service and complaint calls to animal control

    Contributor(s):: Scarlett, J., Johnston, N.

    Reducing the number of homeless, nonhuman animals entering and being euthanatized in community shelters is the principal motivation for most spay/neuter (S/N) programs in the United States. This study evaluated the impact of a subsidized S/N clinic opened in 2005 in Transylvania County, North...

  20. Impact of publicly sponsored neutering programs on animal population dynamics at animal shelters: the New Hampshire and Austin experiences

    Contributor(s):: White, S. C., Jefferson, E., Levy, J. K.

    This study found that government-funded surgical sterilization of companion animals has been widely promoted as a means of decreasing shelter intake and euthanasia. However, little information is available about the true impact of these programs on community and shelter nonhuman animal population...