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  1. A 'long-fuse domestication' of the horse? Tooth shape suggests explosive change in modern breeds compared to extinct populations and living Przewalski horses

    Contributor(s):: Krish Seetah, Andrea Cardini, Graeme Barker

    Archaeological and molecular data suggest that horses were domesticated comparatively recently, the genetic evidence indicating that this was from several maternal haplotypes but only a single paternal one. However, although central to our understanding of how humans and environmental conditions...

  2. The social neuroscience of human-animal interaction

    Contributor(s):: Freund, Lisa S., McCune, Sandra, Esposito, Layla, Gee, Nancy R., McCardle, Peggy

  3. Neural mechanisms underlying human-animal interaction: An evolutionary perspective

    Contributor(s):: Carter, C. Sue, Porges, Stephen W., Freund, Lisa S., McCune, Sandra, Esposito, Layla, Gee, Nancy R., McCardle, Peggy

  4. Affiliation in human-animal interaction

    Contributor(s):: Beetz, Andrea, Bales, Karen, Freund, Lisa S., McCune, Sandra, Esposito, Layla, Gee, Nancy R., McCardle, Peggy

  5. The Dog, the Scientist's best friend: Per Jensen at TEDxNorrkoping

    Contributor(s):: Per Jensen

    This talk deals with the evolution and development of the dog and the basic aspects of dog behavior and its connection to genetics and comparison with human behaviour. A dog can learn to count, and to distinguish verbs from adjectives. It is clear that dogs understand humans much better than has...

  6. Affiliation in human-animal interaction

    Contributor(s):: Beetz, Andrea, Bales, Karen

  7. The cry of a "New Born" | Susan Lingle | TEDxUniversityofWinnipeg

    Contributor(s):: Susan Lingle

    Mammals know a young creature in need when they hear it. Humans often respond to cries of infants from different species. What about other animals? Are the cries of different species similar enough for parents from one species to respond to the cries of another?Susan Lingle’s research...

  8. Prehistoric to Posthuman: Animality, Inheritance, and Identity in American Evolutionary Narratives

    Contributor(s):: Deborah Bailin

    This project examines how Darwinian discourse has influenced representations of the relationship between animality and humanness in twentieth-century American literature. Scholarship in the conceptually rich and growing field of animal studies, to which my dissertation contributes, covers a wide...

  9. Coping strategies in captive capuchin monkeys ( Sapajus spp.)

    Contributor(s):: Ferreira, R. G., Mendl, M., Wagner, P. G. C., Araujo, T., Nunes, D., Mafra, A. L.

    Studies on diverse species indicate the existence of individual differences in stress coping strategies labelled as 'proactive' and 'reactive'. Identifying taxonomic distribution of such coping strategies is fundamental to evolutionary models and to management of captive animals. Capuchin monkeys...

  10. Como piensan los animales: Alex Kacelnik at TEDxPuraVida

    Contributor(s):: Alex Kacelnik

    His interest is to understand animal behavior in light of the ecological problems that evolution presents species in their natural circumstancesAlex Kacelnik is Professor of Behavioral Ecology at the University of Oxford , UK.His interest is to understand animal behavior in light of the...

  11. Dog Behavior: An Evolutionary Perspective

    Contributor(s):: Laura Noel

    The behavior of the modern domesticated dog is heavily influenced in its evolutionary history. I studied the evolution of the domestic dog from its origins and applied this evolutionary history to understanding the behavior of domestic dogs, and how it differs from undomesticated canine species....

  12. On the moral status of humanized chimeras and the concept of human dignity

    Contributor(s):: Ravelingien, A., Braeckman, J., Legge, M.

  13. Ethics and Evolutionary Continuity: Comments on De Waal, Lyons, Moran, and Kraemer

    Contributor(s):: Hawkins, R.

  14. Response: What Does Evolutionary Theory Tell Us about the Moral Status of Animals?

    Contributor(s):: Menta, Timothy

  15. Parsimony, Evolution, and Animal Pain

    Contributor(s):: Rosenfeld, Robert P.

  16. The Possibility of an Evolutionary Semantics

    Contributor(s):: Sheets-Johnstone, Maxine

  17. What Makes Us So Different from the Apes?

    Contributor(s):: Layng, Tony

  18. Social support does not require attachment: any conspecific tranquilizes isolated guinea-pig pups

    Contributor(s):: Tokumaru, R. S., Ades, C., Monticelli, P. F.

    Guinea pig pups produce typical distress whistles when isolated. Whistles' frequency is decreased or abolished when they contact with the mother and, to a lesser degree, a sibling or even an unfamiliar female, is regained. Those non-aggressive companions were considered social support providers...

  19. Evaluation of environmental and intrinsic factors that contribute to stereotypic behavior in captive rhesus macaques ( Macaca mulatta)

    Contributor(s):: Gottlieb, D. H., Maier, A., Coleman, K.

    Full body repetitive behaviors, known as motor stereotypic behaviors (MSBs), are one of the most commonly seen abnormal behaviors in captive non-human primates, and are frequently used as a behavioral measure of well-being. The main goal of this paper was to examine the role of environmental...

  20. Converging on ancient bones: a review of the evidence for the close relatedness of humans ( Homo sapiens) and spotted hyenas ( Crocuta crocuta)

    Contributor(s):: Baynes-Rock, M.

    The majority of spotted hyena studies are conducted in places such as national parks and reserves where there are few humans present other than the researchers. I argue that this reflects a perception that "real" hyenas are those largely unaffected by contact with humans. This is at odds with...